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first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — You have seen and taken pictures of our favorite places in Wilmington. But have you seen that same view from above? Joe Turner Photography will show you views of our town from the treetop level.Turner’s photography will be on display in the Wilmington Memorial Library’s second-floor Meeting Room during the month of May for public viewing.Turner will hold a public reception with light refreshments on Monday, May 6, 2019 at 7pm. Step back in time and view a comparison of iconic Wilmington buildings and places alongside historic pictures of the same familiar sites. All are welcome.(NOTE: The above information is from the Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber of Commerce.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington-Tewksbury Chamber of Commerce Gives ‘Welcome Bags’ To New ResidentsIn “Business”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, May 6, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber Of Commerce Invites Local Business Owners To Woburn Networking EventIn “Business”last_img read more

first_imgSalman Khan, Katrina Kaif in BharatYouTube ScreenshotSalman Khan is extremely confident not just about the content of his upcoming movie Bharat, but also on the work done by his co-actress Katrina Kaif in it. So much so that the superstar feels Katrina will bag a national award for her performance in the film.At a recent song launch event of Bharat, Salman could not stop praising his co-actress’ work in the film. He is so impressed by her that he went on to say that Katrina will definitely get national award for it.”Katrina will get national award for this film,” he said at the event. When the reporter and Katrina laughed on it, he added,” Seriously. You will see. She is so good in the film, and she has worked so hard in it. So, it is certain that if anyone would get national award, it will be Katrina only”.At the same event, Salman also praised Sunil Grover saying that he is one of the most talented actors he ever came across. Apart from Salman, Katrina and Sunil, the film also features Disha Patani in a key role.Directed by Ali Abbas Zafar, Bharat is one of the most awaited films of this year like most other movies of Salman. The superstar will be seen in multiple avatars in the flick, including that of a 70-year-old man. It is slated to be released on June 5.last_img read more

first_imgPolymer laser. Image credit: Organic Semiconductor Optoelectronics / University of St Andrews This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Detecting hidden explosives is a difficult task but now researchers in the UK have developed a completely new way of detecting them, with a laser sensor capable of detecting molecules of explosives at concentrations of 10 parts per billion (ppb) or less. © 2010 PhysOrg.com New method for detecting explosives More information: Ying Yang et al., Sensitive Explosive Vapor Detection with Polyfluorene Lasers, Advanced Functional Materials, Published Online: 25 May 2010. DOI:10.1002/adfm.200901904 Explore further The laser sensor, developed by physicists from the University of St Andrews in Fife, Scotland, relies on the fact that when a type of plastic called polyfluorene is “pumped” with photons of light from a light source it emits laser light. When molecules of the vapors emitted by explosives such as TNT are present, they interfere with the laser light, switching off the emission, and the interference can be measured.One of the scientists, Dr. Graham Turnbull, explained that there is a dilute, weak cloud of vapors of nitroaromatic-based explosive molecules above an explosive device. He said the laser could be thought of as an “artificial nose for a robot dog.”In the study a plastic laser was exposed to 1,4-dinitribenzene (DNB) vapors at 9.8 ppb concentration. The light emitted by the laser decreased rapidly, allowing for detection within seconds of the exposure. After 4-5 minutes the response had slowed and then flattened off, which the researchers suggest is due to the vapor molecules interacting with the surface of the polyfluorene. The laser took three and a half hours to recover in air, but only three minutes if nitrogen gas was flushed through it and 20 seconds if purged under a vacuum.The plastic polyfluorene is a cheap material, which is an obvious advantage for a device designed to detect explosives. Dr. Turnbull said that while similar techniques using organic semiconductor lasers had been looked at before, this is the first time scientists have used a polyfluorene laser, and its use enables much lower concentrations of vapors to be detected. Organic semiconductor lasers detect explosive vapors because of a chemical interaction between the vapor and the semiconductor in which electrons are transferred from the semiconductor to the electron-deficient vapor molecules. It is this transfer of electrons that reduces the light emitted by the laser. The same electron-transfer effect occurs with the new polyfluorene laser.The drawback with the laser sensors is that the explosives must be in the very near vicinity, which limits its use for humans, but they could prove extremely useful for applications such as roadside bomb detection in Iraq and Afghanistan, for security checkpoints, luggage screening in airports, and for bomb disposal robots generally. The system could also be used in conjunction with remotely controlled robots for detecting land mines, which are still a danger to people in areas such as Southeast Asia.The findings were published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. Citation: Plastic laser detects tiny amounts of explosives (2010, June 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-plastic-laser-tiny-amounts-explosives.htmllast_img read more