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first_img Post a comment Share your voice Winter solstice starts on Dec. 21. Google It’s time to bundle up for the official start of winter, and the longest night of the year.A Google Doodle posted Friday celebrates the winter solstice for those who live in the Northern Hemisphere. And if you live in the Southern Hemisphere, Google has a warm and sunny version to mark the summer solstice.Google previously showed these Doodles on June 21, but in the opposite locations, to make the summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere and winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere.Summer solstice starts on Dec. 21, if you live in the Southern Hemisphere. Google Humans have celebrated this day since ancient times. In England, crowds gather at Stonehenge to capture the moment with the sun directly aligns with the ancient stones, Google notes in its blog post. In China, winter’s arrival is celebrated with the Dongzhi Festival. This year’s winter solstice officially starts at 2:23 p.m. PT, when the sun is directly over the Tropic of Capricorn, located at 23.5 degrees south latitude. Now go out there and catch some snowflakes! Or enjoy the swimming hole!First published June 21, 10:49 a.m. PT. Update, Dec. 21 at 6:48 a.m. PT: Highlights the winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. ‘Hello, humans’: Google’s Duplex could make Assistant the most lifelike AI yet. Culture: Your hub for everything from film and television to music, comics, toys and sports. Random Digital Media 0 Tags Googlelast_img read more

first_img 00:00 /50:25 X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen On Wednesday’s Houston Matters: Just a day after it was announced, the Houston firefighters union is withdrawing from an upcoming debate on the pay parity ballot measure. They were set to share the stage with Mayor Sylvester Turner at a community forum on Saturday. We learn more.Also this hour: From the latest on the FBI investigation into allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, to a New York Times investigation into the Trump family’s taxes, our experts discuss the latest national, state, and local political stories with an eye for how they might affect Houston and Texas.Then, former Republican South Carolina Congressman Bob Inglis explains how he went from climate change denier to advocate for action on the issue.And we visit a local production of Evil Dead: The Musical.WATCH: Today’s Houston Matters 360-Degree Facebook Live Video. We offer a daily podcast here, on iTunes, Stitcher and other podcasting apps. This article is part of the Houston Matters podcast Sharelast_img read more