Tags : 上海龙风 论坛

first_img 2019 Toyota Camry Review #8 @Toyota_Hybrid TS050 wins the 24 Hours of Le Mans for the second time this Super season! Well done to @alo_oficial, @kazuki_info and @Sebastien_buemi!#WEC #SuperFinale #LeMans24 pic.twitter.com/fEgnzaxiRc— 24 Hours of Le Mans (@24hoursoflemans) June 16, 2019 Post a comment Toyota Also taking home class wins were the No. 36 Signatech Alpine (LMP2); No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari 488 GTE (GTE Pro) and the No. 85 Ford GT of Keating Motorsports (GTE Am class). The win was something of a redemption for the Blue Oval, as the automaker’s own factory-backed effort failed to finish better than fourth place in GTE Pro in the car’s last race.For full race results, see the race’s official site, 24LeMans.org. 0 Roadshow Car Culture Toyotacenter_img More From Roadshow 2020 Toyota Corolla review: More emotional, still sensible 2020 Toyota 4Runner first drive: Same as it ever was — mostly Tags Enlarge ImageToyota took 1-2 at the grueling 24 Hours of Le Mans, just not in the expected order. Toyota It was a foregone conclusion, yet it was anything but. On Sunday, Toyota’s Gazoo Racing team notched its second 1-2 victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in as many years. It’s an impressive achievement and Toyota’s was a dominant performance. Yet the win didn’t come without some surprises, including a costly final-hour gaffe that resulted in the longtime race-leading car No. 7, of Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and José Maria López, slipping into second place.It was no surprise that the pair of Toyota TS050 hybrid racers would dominate the 87th running of France’s legendary endurance race from the opening laps to the close of the 24th hour. They were the only factory-backed cars contesting the top-tier LMP1 class. But a final-hour puncture (the second in as many hours) and some pit-lane drama centering on a bum tire sensor triggered the replacement of the wrong wheel, costing the No. 7 car a storybook victory. Instead, the No. 8 car of Fernando Alonso, Sébastien Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima, took the checkered flag, taking the FIA WEC series win in the process. Toyota’s 1-2 finishing order results mirror those of last year.  Share your voicelast_img read more

first_imgRepresentational Image: Woman Abuse/PixabayA woman was stripped, beaten up and stabbed by her husband’s family members in Bengaluru late on Wednesday. Her daughter was also injured.The incident came into light after the woman went to Banaswadi police station and sought action against her husband’s family. She claimed she was brutally attacked by her brother-in-law Satish and his family around midnight.A resident of Kammanahalli, the victim’s husband had passed away earlier this year and she along with her two children was living with Satish, his wife Pramila and their daughter.On Wednesday morning, the victim was involved in a heated argument with her sister-in-law after she accused her of being a prostitute. The fight became intense when her sister-in-law started throwing slippers and stones at the victim and asked her to vacate the house.The woman went to the police station to file a complaint against her in-laws, but the police advised her to come the next day. After leaving the police station, the victim returned home by 11 pm.Her in-laws came to know that she had filed a complaint. Satish and Pramila then attacked her with a knife and thrashed her. She was also stripped by her brother-in-law in the middle of the road. Their daughter also attacked the victim and her children.”I was parking my bike when Pramila came out with a knife all of a sudden and picked up a fight with me for approaching the police. Soon, her husband and her daughter too joined in. They pulled me, harassed me and stabbed me with the knife on my face. They removed my clothes while their daughter hit me on my head with a stone. My brother-in-law Satish removed my T-shirt and I couldn’t escape till my brother returned home. Their daughter hit my daughter too for recording the whole incident on my phone,” said the victim, reports Bangalore Mirror.The woman was so scared to go back home that she found solace at the police station and filed a complaint against Satish and his family members for abusing and harassing her and her children.The police have arrested Satish for misbehaving with the woman.last_img read more

first_imgJax Jacobsen As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 News • Photos of the Week Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 By: Jax Jacobsen Catholicism By: Jax Jacobsen TagsBill 21 homepage featured Parti Quebecois Quebec religious discrimination religious freedom,You may also like Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Quebec’s provincial assembly will vote Friday (June 14) on Bill 21, a controversial measure that would ban public-sector workers in positions of authority from wearing any sort of religious symbolism while at their job. If passed, the law would bar Muslim women who wear the hijab, Sikhs wearing turbans and Jewish men wearing kippas, among others, from being able to work as teachers, police officers and judges. Christians would also have to remove their crosses.More drastically, however, Bill 21 would also prohibit anyone from wearing religious symbols while receiving services from government bodies, including transit, doctors and dentists, school boards or subsidized day cares. If it passes, women wearing religious covering — including the niqab — would not be able to use a bus without revealing their faces.The governing Coalition Avenir Quebec hopes to pass the law before heading on summer break.An overview of Bill 21The measure, which CAQ promised to pass in last fall’s electoral campaign, aims to protect the secularity of the province. According to the text of the law, it also “attaches importance to the equality of women and men.”The proposed bill immediately drew criticism from Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who called it “unthinkable” that “in a free society we would legitimize discrimination against citizens based on their religion,” while legal scholars maintain that the bill clearly violates Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms.RELATED: In Quebec, Christian liberalism becomes the religious authorityQuebec Premier François Legault on March 28, 2019, as his government voted on Bill 21. The crucifix behind him would likely disappear if the legislation is passed. (The Canadian Press/Jacques Boissinot)The U.N. has also weighed in on the legislation, warning that the bill could lead to the violation of rights, including rights to health or education.Quebec Premier François Legault insists that the bill is not discriminatory and that what voters want is to settle the issue of religious symbols in the public sphere once and for all.What impact will it have?Groups representing religious minorities are largely unsupportive of the bill and say it is discriminatory.“What it does is disadvantage the women who want to practice their faith from participating in the labor market,” said Nuzhat Jafri, who is executive director of the Canadian Council of Muslim Women.“We’re not talking about large numbers of people foisting their religion on anyone,” Jafri said. “Women are practicing their faith and at the same time they want to be full participants in Quebec society.”During public hearings on the bill in May, Amrit Kaur, the World Sikh Organization’s vice president for Quebec, said the bill was “offensive to neutrality or secularism in the public sector and does nothing to advance the cause of gender equality.” According to the WSO, passing the bill would set a dangerous precedent that would undermine the rights of women and minority religious groups in the province.But those in support of the bill insist such measures are necessary to preserve Quebec’s religious neutrality.“For us, democracy is inseparable from secularism,” said Diane Guilbault, president of Pour les droits des Femmes (For the Rights of Women).“We are not asking for the end of religions. We are asking for the state to disassociate itself completely from them in its relations with citizens,” she said, pointing to how people use religious pretexts to deny rights to women.“The majority of Quebecers — of all backgrounds — support a secular state,” she said.Fourth time’s the charm?CAQ’s bill is the fourth attempt in the legislature to ban religious symbols in the public sector. In 2010, Premier Jean Charest presented a bill requiring individuals to show their face when receiving government services. In 2013, Premier Pauline Marois, with the nationalist Parti Quebecois, tried to pass the Charter of Values, which would have affirmed “state secularism and religious neutrality” while also ensuring the equality of men and women.Like Bill 21, the charter would have banned all public workers, including teachers and those working in the health professions, from wearing conspicuous religious symbols, though smaller pieces of jewelry with religious markings would be permitted.The controversial bill never passed, as Marois lost an April 2014 election she had called to gain an outright majority. Her loss was attributed in part to deep-seated opposition to the charter.The Liberal government that replaced Marois’, however, passed its own religious neutrality bill in October 2017, which banned all public workers and those receiving government services from covering their faces. That law is undergoing legal challenges.CAQ came to power promising to take action on the issue, emphasizing that people were growing tired of the debate.There are differences between the bills, said Daniel Béland, the director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada.“CAQ is going farther than the Liberals,” he said. “The Liberals supported a much more restrictive approach to secularism, while CAQ is closer to the Parti Quebecois in some areas. In the case of the CAQ, it’s a blanket approach, and it’s easier to implement.”How could this happen in Canada?Canada, unlike the U.S., does not have a bill of rights explicitly endorsing freedom of religion.The Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which has existed since 1982, guarantees a number of freedoms, including the freedom of religion and the freedom of assembly. However, it also includes a “notwithstanding clause” that allows provinces to override the charter for five years.Canada is “a very decentralized country, far more than the U.S.,” Béland said. “What the notwithstanding clause does is it allows the parliament, or a provincial legislature, to temporarily override certain aspects of the charter, so it’s something you can do for a limited time and then renew it.”CAQ has included a notwithstanding clause in the bill, which legal experts warn will invite a flurry of legal action.“It’s a controversial move,” Béland said. “It’s the first time that Quebec has used the clause since 1988, when they used it for the Charter of the French Language, to defend legislation to force immigrants in Quebec to go to French schools.”People protest in Karachi, Pakistan, on Feb. 2, 2017, against an attack days earlier on the Quebec Islamic Culture Centre in Canada that killed six Muslim men during evening prayers. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Quebec’s premier at the time, Philippe Couillard, both characterized the attack as a terrorist act. (AP Photo/Fareed Khan)Climate of rising anti-Muslim incidentsThis latest version of a religious neutrality law comes as incidents against religious minorities, and particularly Muslims, have been rising.Most notably, in January 2017, six Muslim men were shot dead in their mosque in Quebec City. According to Statistics Canada, hate crimes against Muslims grew by 253% from 2012 to 2015, largely propelled by incidents in Quebec and Ontario. Since Bill 21 was introduced in the National Assembly, Muslim women in the province say they have experienced increasing levels of provocation.The end of the issue?Though Legault has said he has presented the bill to bring closure to an issue that has dominated Quebec politics for over a decade, it’s unlikely this legislation will succeed in that.Coalition Avenir Quebec leader François Legault, left, speaks on the campaign trail in Montreal in September 2018 before the election that saw his party form a majority government. (The Canadian Press/Ryan Remiorz)Opposition to Bill 21 is very forceful, Béland said, partly because a lot more people will be affected by this bill than by its previous iterations.It also exacerbates divisions in Quebec society.Opposition “is concentrated in Montreal, as it’s by far the largest city in the province and has the most immigrants and the largest Anglophone minority,” he said, referring to the city’s English speakers.Anglophones, in Quebec and across the rest of Canada, are less likely to share the French-speaking population’s attachment to laïcité, a concept of secular assimilation that is also prized in France.But there’s also a clash in age groups, Béland added. “Younger people care less about these issues than older people, and they give more weight to religious freedom than secularism.”Protests were held in Quebec City on Wednesday against the bill. Share This! Jax Jacobsen,Load Comments,California church sues after removal as polling place over Black Lives Matter banners Southern Baptists face sex abuse crisis with litany of lament Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Share This! News Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email By: Jax Jacobsenlast_img read more