Tags : 免费龙凤信息

first_img Comments 4 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Electric Cars Concept Cars SUVs Crossovers 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Jan 22 • Our highlights of the 2019 Detroit Auto Show Feb 7 • Chevy’s full-scale Lego Silverado is plastic fantastic in Chicago See All reading • Cadillac shocks Detroit Auto Show with electric SUV preview More From Roadshow Tags Feb 4 • 2020 Kia Telluride: Detroit Auto Show debut turns Super Bowl ad star Detroit Auto Show 2019 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 72 Photos “Cadillac’s EV will hit the heart of the crossover market and meet the needs of customers around the world,” said Steve Carlisle, president of Cadillac. “It will represent the height of luxury and innovation while positioning Cadillac as the pinnacle of mobility.”Our last encounter with Caddy — when we reviewed the 2019 XT4 — impressed with brand’s equipment, style and design, but left us disappointed by its powertrain and performance. Perhaps a jolt of electric torque and efficiency will be just what the brand needs to stay competitive. On the eve of the 2019 Detroit Auto Show, Cadillac has surprised the media with a first look at an upcoming electric crossover SUV, perhaps the first of many electric vehicles to come for the marque.After recently learning that the Cadillac luxury brand would become General Motors’ “lead electric vehicle brand,” we all expected to see an EV unveiled soon, just not this soon. That said, we’ve only so far seen renderings of the electric crossover with few details regarding specs.Enlarge ImageGM is vowing to reposition Cadillac as an EV brand. Cadillac The EV’s name and specific details regarding its powertrain and range will be revealed closer to an also yet-unspecified launch window. So far, what we do know is that it will be based on GM’s upcoming future “BEV3” electric vehicle platform. The electric Caddy crossover will be just the first in a range of vehicles to make use of the platform, which has been designed to accommodate front-, rear- or all-wheel drive configurations. Expect to see BEV3 underpinning a wide range of GM vehicles globally over the next few years.The rest of the Cadillac brand is also ramping up for lineup overhaul, starting with the XT6 crossover which also debuted ahead of the Detroit show this week. Cadillac also expects to debut about a half-dozen new models — roughly one every six months — leading up to 2021, including the next-generation Escalade and an upcoming performance sedan. How many of those will be plug-in vehicles? We’ll just have to wait and see. Detroit Auto Show 2019 Cadillac Share your voice May 14 • History of the Toyota Supra, a Japanese sports car legend 2020 Cadillac XT6: Caddy’s new three-row crossover is heavy on tech • Cadillaclast_img read more

first_imgThis combination of pictures shows US President-elect Donald Trump (L) and Russian President Vladimir Putin. AFP file photoDonald Trump and Vladimir Putin discussed steps to ease Syria’s civil war and a possible first face-to-face meeting, during what the White House described as a “very good call” Tuesday.The US and Russian leaders spoke by telephone, focusing on the six-year-old Syrian conflict, which has pitched Moscow and Washington into rival camps.“President Trump and President Putin agreed that the suffering in Syria has gone on for far too long and that all parties must do all they can to end the violence,” the White House said.Trump aides also said “the conversation was a very good one” that included “discussion of safe, or de-escalation, zones” in Syria “to achieve lasting peace for humanitarian and many other reasons.”The White House said the two leaders also spoke about “how best to resolve the very dangerous situation in North Korea.”And the Kremlin added that both men were “in favor” of meeting at a G20 summit in Germany this July.That meeting is sure to be closely watched in the United States, where Trump has come under sustained criticism over his campaign’s ties to Russia and his praise of Putin.US intelligence agencies believe that Putin approved of a wide-ranging campaign to tilt the 2016 election in Trump’s favor, prompting US sanctions imposed by former president Barack Obama.The FBI is still investigating possible collusion between the campaign and Moscow.Trump has been muted in his criticism, but tensions between the White House and the Kremlin have resurfaced after the suspected use of the chemical agent sarin against civilians prompted Trump to strike a Syrian regime airbase also used by Russia.Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the call—which he sat in on—was “very productive” with “a lot of detailed exchanges.”“We’ll see where we go from here.”No details were given about the possible safe zones, which have long been discussed, but faltered as Bashar al-Assad’s regime and assorted groups of rebels, Kurds, Iranian-backed militias, Al-Qaeda and Islamic State fighters have kept-up a bloody war that has killed an estimated half million people.The Kremlin, meanwhile, said “the emphasis was put on the potential for coordination of actions by the United States and Russia in the fight against terrorism.”The State Department earlier announced that it would send a junior minister to Russian-backed peace talks in Astana later this week.last_img read more

first_imgA depiction of the double helical structure of DNA. Its four coding units (A, T, C, G) are color-coded in pink, orange, purple and yellow. Credit: NHGRI © 2018 Phys.org Citation: Should the police be allowed to use genetic information in public databases to track down criminals? (2018, June 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-police-genetic-databases-track-criminals.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. How cops used a public genealogy database in the Golden State Killer case Journal information: Sciencecenter_img A trio of concerned citizens from the University of Baltimore and Baylor College of Medicine has published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science surrounding the issue of law enforcement using genetic information in public databases to pursue criminals. In their paper, Natalie Ram, Christi Guerrini and Amy McGuire highlight the issues involved and offer some suggestions regarding how the issue might best be handled. More information: Natalie Ram et al. Genealogy databases and the future of criminal investigation, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aau1083SummaryThe 24 April 2018 arrest of Joseph James DeAngelo as the alleged Golden State Killer, suspected of more than a dozen murders and 50 rapes in California, has raised serious societal questions related to personal privacy. The break in the case came when investigators compared DNA recovered from victims and crime scenes to other DNA profiles searchable in a free genealogical database called GEDmatch. This presents a different situation from the analysis of DNA of individuals arrested or convicted of certain crimes, which has been collected in the U.S. National DNA Index System (NDIS) for forensic purposes since 1989. The search of a nonforensic database for law enforcement purposes has caught public attention, with many wondering how common such searches are, whether they are legal, and what consumers can do to protect themselves and their families from prying police eyes. Investigators are already rushing to make similar searches of GEDmatch in other cases, making ethical and legal inquiry into such use urgent. Explore further The case of police arresting a man suspected of being the Golden State Killer made headlines recently, partly because of the notoriety of the case and partly because of the way the case was cracked. The police compared DNA samples taken from crime scenes with those in a public database and found a close match—someone who was related to the suspect. Further work allowed them to narrow their search down to the man who was arrested. While most people likely received the news of a serial killer’s capture as good news, others were also concerned about how it happened. This led to questions about the privacy of data in public databases—such as whether the police should be allowed to use such data to search for a suspect.The authors point out that there is no law forbidding what the police did—the genetic profiles came from people who willingly and of their own accord gave up their DNA data. But should there be? If you send a swab to Ancestry.com, for example, should the genetic profile they create be off-limits to anyone but you and them? It is doubtful that many who take such actions fully consider the ways in which their profile might be used. Most such companies routinely sell their data to pharmaceutical companies or others looking to use the data to make a profit, for example. Should they also be compelled to give up such data due to a court order? The authors suggest that if the public wants their DNA information to remain private, they need to contact their representatives and demand that legislation that lays out specific rules for data housed in public databases.last_img read more