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first_imgThis natural-color view from NASA’s Terra satellite shows the Great Lakes region on Sunday.  Joshua Stevens/NASA EOSDIS/LANCE/GIBS/Worldview While people down on Earth are freezing their tushies off as a polar vortex sweeps across parts of the US, NASA’s eyes in the sky are looking down from the cold environs of space. The space agency posted a Wednesday update with a view from its Terra satellite.The Terra image on Sunday showed “cloud streets,” long stripes of cumulus clouds, and snow reaching across the Great Lakes. The frigid weather is triggering closures, flight cancellations and at least six weather-related deaths so far. “It’ll be colder in Chicago that it is in parts of the Arctic Circle. Even the South Pole is expected to be warmer than parts of the US,” says CBS News. Sci-Tech Share your voice #GOESEast spotted snow on the ground as the sun rose on what will be a bitterly cold day across much of the U.S. A cold Arctic air mass is surging south into the upper Midwest before spreading across much of the eastern two-thirds of the country. More: https://t.co/vBfvFRrnHF pic.twitter.com/rwoTjV5vX6— NOAA Satellites (@NOAASatellites) January 30, 2019 As polar vortex rolls in, Twitter rolls out Star Wars Hoth memes Giant spinning ice disc in river looks like the moon fell to Earth 0 NASA Spacecenter_img So cold Post a comment Tags NASA sees breathtaking clouds on Earth and beyond NASA also shared a look at the cold air mass reaching down into the northern US as envisioned with data run through the GEOS-5 global atmospheric model. “Measurements of temperature, moisture, wind speeds and directions, and other conditions are compiled from NASA satellites and other sources, and then added to the model to closely simulate observed reality,” says NASA.geos5ploarvortex2019This map shows a modeled view of the polar vortex. Joshua Stevens/GEOS-5/NASA EOSDIS/LANCE/GIBS/Worldview The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tweeted a dramatic look at the Great Lakes on Wednesday. The time-lapse sequence shows a white veil forming over the area as the cold Arctic air mass surges south. 22 Photoslast_img read more

first_imgPeople hold a placard as they take part with others in a rally against anti-semitism in Marseille on 19 February 19, 2019.Thousands of people, some carrying banners proclaiming ‘That’s enough’, took to the streets of the French capital Tuesday evening to protest a spate of recent anti-Semitic attacks, including the daubing of swastikas on nearly 100 graves in a Jewish cemetery in eastern France.The Paris rally, in the city’s central Place de la Republique, was one of about 70 staged nationwide Tuesday in response to a surge in anti-Semitic hate crimes which have triggered a deluge of outrage in France and Israel.Eighteen political parties urged citizens to attend the protests, with prime minister Edouard Philippe and more than half his cabinet attending the rally in Paris.Two former presidents, the socialist Francois Hollande, and the conservative Nicolas Sarkozy also turned up. Parliament suspended its work for several hours to allow MPs to attend the rally, while religious leaders met with the interior minister to affirm their unity.Speaking on television Philippe said it was necessary to punish those who “because of ideology, because they think it’s an easy option, because of ignorance or hostility call into question what we are—a diverse but proud people”.Earlier in the day president Emmanuel Macron also promised to crack down on hate crimes when inspecting a cemetery in Quatzenheim in the Alsace region near Germany where 96 Jewish tombstones were spray-painted with blue and yellow swastikas the previous night.“We shall act, we shall pass laws, we shall punish,” Macron told Jewish leaders as he toured the cemetery.“Those who did this are not worthy of the Republic,” he said, later placing a white rose on a tombstone commemorating Jews deported to Germany during World War II.Another grave bore the words “Elsassisches Schwarzen Wolfe” (“Black Alsatian Wolves), a separatist group with links to neo-Nazis in the 1970s.It was the second recent case of extensive cemetery desecration in the region. In December nearly 40 graves as well as a monument to Holocaust victims were vandalised in Herrlisheim, about a half-hour drive from Quatzenheim.Macron and his wife, Brigitte, later laid a wreath at the Paris Holocaust memorial.‘Shocking’ vandalismIsraeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu slammed the “shocking” anti-Semitic vandalism, while one of his cabinet colleagues urged French Jews to “come home” to Israel.Many French Jews are on edge after the government announced a 74 per cent jump in anti-Jewish offences in 2018 after two years of declines.Tensions mounted last weekend after a prominent French writer was the target of a violent tirade by a “yellow vest” protester in Paris on Saturday.A video of the scene showed the protester calling the philosopher Alain Finkielkraut a “dirty Zionist” and telling him “France belongs to us”.In France, several officials have accused the grass-roots yellow vest movement of unleashing a wave of extremist violence that has fostered anti-Semitic outbursts among some participants.“It would be false and absurd to call the yellow vest movement anti-Semitic,” Philippe told L’Express magazine in an interview published Tuesday.The prime minister, who has promised a tough new law targeting online hate speech by this summer, warned however that “anti-Semitism has very deep roots in French society”.Long historyMacron, for his part, is to lay out his plans to combat anti-Semitism during a speech at the annual dinner of the CRIF umbrella association of French Jewish groups on Wednesday.Anti-Semitism has a long history in France where society was deeply split at the end of the 19th century by the Alfred Dreyfus affair, a Jewish army captain wrongly convicted of treason.During World War II, the French Vichy government collaborated with Germany notably in the deportation of Jews to death camps.More recently French anti-Semitism, traditionally associated with the far right, has also spread among far-left pro-Palestinian extremists and radicals from amongst the growing Muslim community.But Macron has resisted calls by some lawmakers to explicitly penalise so-called anti-Zionist statements calling into question Israel’s right to exist as a nation.A recent Ifop poll of “yellow vest” backers found that nearly half those questioned believed in a worldwide “Zionist plot” and other conspiracy theories.last_img read more

first_imgElectric vehicles and hybrids have been around — in one form or another — for a generation now. A decade ago, there were two major impediments to EVs catching on: the range of a battery charge and the lack of infrastructure, like charging stations around the country.But has that changed — has the environment (pun somewhat intended) for electric vehicles improved in Greater Houston in recent years?In an interview from the Houston Auto Show, we talk it over with Nic Phillips, founding member of the Ideal Electric Company and former president of the Texas Auto Writers Association; Gigi Rill from the Rice Electric Vehicle Club; and Carroll Smith, president of Monument Chevrolet in Pasadena. Sharelast_img read more

first_imgPolymer laser. Image credit: Organic Semiconductor Optoelectronics / University of St Andrews This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Detecting hidden explosives is a difficult task but now researchers in the UK have developed a completely new way of detecting them, with a laser sensor capable of detecting molecules of explosives at concentrations of 10 parts per billion (ppb) or less. © 2010 PhysOrg.com New method for detecting explosives More information: Ying Yang et al., Sensitive Explosive Vapor Detection with Polyfluorene Lasers, Advanced Functional Materials, Published Online: 25 May 2010. DOI:10.1002/adfm.200901904 Explore further The laser sensor, developed by physicists from the University of St Andrews in Fife, Scotland, relies on the fact that when a type of plastic called polyfluorene is “pumped” with photons of light from a light source it emits laser light. When molecules of the vapors emitted by explosives such as TNT are present, they interfere with the laser light, switching off the emission, and the interference can be measured.One of the scientists, Dr. Graham Turnbull, explained that there is a dilute, weak cloud of vapors of nitroaromatic-based explosive molecules above an explosive device. He said the laser could be thought of as an “artificial nose for a robot dog.”In the study a plastic laser was exposed to 1,4-dinitribenzene (DNB) vapors at 9.8 ppb concentration. The light emitted by the laser decreased rapidly, allowing for detection within seconds of the exposure. After 4-5 minutes the response had slowed and then flattened off, which the researchers suggest is due to the vapor molecules interacting with the surface of the polyfluorene. The laser took three and a half hours to recover in air, but only three minutes if nitrogen gas was flushed through it and 20 seconds if purged under a vacuum.The plastic polyfluorene is a cheap material, which is an obvious advantage for a device designed to detect explosives. Dr. Turnbull said that while similar techniques using organic semiconductor lasers had been looked at before, this is the first time scientists have used a polyfluorene laser, and its use enables much lower concentrations of vapors to be detected. Organic semiconductor lasers detect explosive vapors because of a chemical interaction between the vapor and the semiconductor in which electrons are transferred from the semiconductor to the electron-deficient vapor molecules. It is this transfer of electrons that reduces the light emitted by the laser. The same electron-transfer effect occurs with the new polyfluorene laser.The drawback with the laser sensors is that the explosives must be in the very near vicinity, which limits its use for humans, but they could prove extremely useful for applications such as roadside bomb detection in Iraq and Afghanistan, for security checkpoints, luggage screening in airports, and for bomb disposal robots generally. The system could also be used in conjunction with remotely controlled robots for detecting land mines, which are still a danger to people in areas such as Southeast Asia.The findings were published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. Citation: Plastic laser detects tiny amounts of explosives (2010, June 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-plastic-laser-tiny-amounts-explosives.htmllast_img read more

first_imgDaniell’s Tavern brings Navratri in a bang of flavours with satvik cuisine in a traditional thali, for a satiating dining experience while you fast. Our chefs have carefully put together temple food on a delicious platter featuring Sabudana Khichdi, Chironji Ki Dal, Kabab-e-Kela, Kheere Ka Pakoda and Makhana kheer to satiate you every bit.When: October -13-22, Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Timings: 6:30 pm-11:45 pm Price for two: 5000+ taxesKheere ka pakodaChef Prem Pogakula, the executive Sous Chef of The Imperial, New Delhi, shares his recipe of Kheere ke pakode, a Navratra special dish at ‘Daniell’s Tavern’.Ingredients:-Kuttu ka atta- 60gmsKaloungi– 5gmsSendha Namak- to tasteGrated boiled potato 80gmsGrated cucumber 80gmsShredded Spinach-60gmsWater- 80mlOil to deep fryDahi Aur Kheerre ke chutneyThick curd-100gmsGrated cucumber-40gmsSendha Namak-to tasteA pinch of turmeric tempered and a tea spoon of hot ghee Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixMethod:-For chutneyMix all the ingredients and check for seasoning.For pakodaMix all the above ingredients and make thick batter consistence and check for seasoning.Heat oil in a pan and make small dumpling from the mixture.Now Deep fry the dumpling till golden brown and till cooked from inside.Serve hot with dahi chutney.last_img read more

first_imgMarch 18, 2016Here is alumnus architect Salah Alsaqqa in June 1981 with Paolo Soleri. Thank you for sharing this photo with us.[photo courtesy Salah Alsaqqa]Salah returned for part the March 2016 workshop and here he is in the Soleri Archives, scanning some of Paolo Soleri spiral notebooks.last_img

first_imgAlmost two thirds of people (64%) have used a second screen device while watching TV, behaviour that is changing the way that viewers engage with ads, according to new research.The latest data, from GfK’s Connected Consumer research, claims that 38% of ‘second screeners’ would like TV ads to be targeted to them and 24% are keen to buy products advertised on TV via a synchronised mobile app.One in five said that they would like the websites for products, personalities or adverts that have just been shown on television to automatically appear on their computer, smartphone or tablet so they don’t need to search for them. This was up from 13% in 2013.“What’s fascinating from this research is the sheer pace and depth of change we’re seeing in TV consumption patterns over only 12 months,” said Christine Connor, GfK research director for brand and customer experience.“Appetite for targeted advertising and for ads to synchronise across all devices being used is growing and this looks set to have a major impact on the way people respond to ads, and the way advertisers and brands use TV to communicate their messages.”Second screen users said that their laptop or netbook was their most commonly used companion device at 61%, compared to 56% for smartphones and 31% for tablets.last_img read more

first_imgTiVo is exhibiting at IBC on stand 14.L03 Spanish cable operator Ono has expanded its TiVo deployment by using TiVo’s cloud service APIs to offer consistent integrated search, browse and discovery capabilities across any screen. Ono announced at IBC that it will integrate TiVo’s service capabilities into its TV everywhere mobile and web apps, including search and discovery and remote PVR recording management functionalities.Ono is among TiVo’s first cable operator partners to announce it will use TiVo’s set of APIs to create a consistent, TiVo-powered experience for customers who want to consume content across any device.“Our customers’ feedback on the TiVo solution has been resoundingly positive, TiVo has already provided a positive boost to our video offering and has consistently delivered high satisfaction.We are committed to extending a consistent TiVo experience on any device our subscribers would like to use to consume content. By leveraging the TiVo Service APIs, we’ll be able to deliver the TiVo experience to more of the devices used by our subscribers,” said Nick Ontiveros, director of marketing, TV at ONO.Ono first partnered with TiVo in 2011 to develop its next-generationTV offering. The service is now used by more than 400,000 Ono customers.last_img read more