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first_imgLAKE CHAMPLAIN REGIONAL CHAMBER, GBIC GO LIVE WITH “VOTE! 2004″Comprehensive survey of candidates is in-depth Election Day referencepieceBURLINGTON – The Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce and GBIChave gone live on the Web with “VOTE! 2004,” which contains the results ofa survey of candidates running for state offices in the November 2 GeneralElection. Results are available at www.lcrccsurvey.org/candidates(link is external).Those surveyed include candidates for Governor and Lieutenant Governor aswell as candidates for State Senator and State Representative fromChittenden County. With a new and exciting theme and Web-based access,the results are intended to help the business community learn more aboutcandidates and encourage and remind them to vote on Election Day.The Chamber and GBIC “VOTE! 2004” report contains two parts. The first isa biographical section provided by each candidate who responded, as wellas a list of each candidate’s top three legislative priorities. Thesecond part consists of PDF documents as pull-out grids containing allcandidates’ names and, from those who responded, answers to a series ofmultiple choice questions relating to eight broad public policy areas.According to A. Wayne Roberts, Chamber President, “As a leading businessorganization, we strive to provide information on the candidates toencourage more discussion about legislative issues and greaterparticipation in the political process.””VOTE! 2004 includes responses on a wide variety of public policy issuesand should assist voters in making decisions at the polls on November 2,”added GBIC President Frank Cioffi.Both Cioffi and Roberts are pleased with the universally accessible,Web-based format that the piece has taken on this year.The Chamber and GBIC produce “VOTE! 2004” as a benefit to the entireregion. The report is not intended to advocate expressly or implicitly for thesuccess or defeat of any particular candidate or party. Candidates, themedia and other organizations are encouraged to link to the site orpublish portions of the report in print or on the Web at no charge. Toobtain permission to do such or for questions, contact Mary Sprayregen,Chamber/GBIC Director of Government Affairs at 802-863-3489 ext. 210 ormary@vermont.org(link sends e-mail).The LCRCC is a nonprofit organization that provides socially responsibleleadership to enhance the economic environment of the Lake ChamplainRegion and Vermont. GBIC is a private nonprofit economic developmentcorporation that serves as a catalyst for industrial and economic growthin Chittenden County.last_img read more

first_img Latest posts by (see all) Latest Posts Donald Trump Jr. to host Holden campaign event – September 18, 2020 Bio ELLSWORTH — Dozens of paddlers competed in the Union River race on Sunday on the Union River.Competitors paddled from below the Graham Lake dam to the Ellsworth marina, where they had a potluck and feasted on mussels.The race raised $150. Proceeds are going to the Maine Heritage Orchard at the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association in Unity.Results are listed below. “K” indicates Kayak, “OC” indicates Open Canoe, and the number indicates the number of people per boat. The “Open” class consisted of one three-person canoe.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textK1 long: Ray Wirth 43:06; Ben Randall 43:21.K1 short: Dan Baumert 55:00.K1 women: Leslie Gregory 1:00:55.OC2 Mixed Racing: Susannah and Jeff Owen 47:29; Angus Deighan and Abbey Verrier 48:21; Eve Dana and Bill Deighan 52:15.OC2 Mixed Rec: Fiona Hamilton and Chris Mares 1:09:43.OC 1 Rec: Chris Dalton 56:43; Mark Risinger 57:23; Jake Feener 57:35; Bob Hessler 1:03:27.OC1 Racing: Charlie Smith 51:11.OC 2 Women Rec: Tammy Kelley and Ander Thebaud 56:29.OC1 High School: Hannah Rubin 1:08:23.Open: Megan McOsker, Ava Drennan and Noreen Hogan 1:45:12. Real Estate Transfers Week of Sept. 17 – September 18, 2020 Drive-thru flu shot clinics scheduled – September 18, 2020last_img read more

first_imgThe star that shines brightest in the constellation of power basketball conferences remains, now almost perpetually, the Big East. From No. 3 Syracuse to the No. 25 upstart Cincinnati Bearcats, eight schools from the nation’s most complete conference continue to litter both NCAA polls. A Big East-flavored top 25 is about as close to a given as sports will allow.Each year since 2004, the gauntlet from hell, which poses as the Big East conference, has yielded at least five schools in the year-end polls and has sent more teams to dance in March than any other conference in the country. And it appears that in 2011 we will not encounter an aberration to that compounding trend.But what has made this conference into the powerhouse that it has become? Why do we, year in and year out, find ourselves staring at Jim Boeheim’s shiny head on the big stages or have to, once again, root against another Bob Huggins-coached team replete with players who have no intentions to graduate from college?It’s the coaching.Whether athletes remain in college for the full four years or not, rosters frequently change, meaning that, barring removal from their positions, coaches are often the only constant.And the head coaches in the Big East are far and away the best group in the country.Two of the coaches, Boeheim of Syracuse and Jim Calhoun of Connecticut, are now fixtures in the record books as they, with each passing season, climb closer to the acme of all-time wins by a head coach (currently held by Bob Knight with 902).Boeheim (843 career wins), a devout professor of the 2-3 zone, consistently produces teams that frequent the late rounds of the NCAA tournament. But aside from Carmelo Anthony, with whom the Hall of Fame head coach won his only national championship, the list of superstars that have come through Syracuse runs rather short. In fact, the list might end with ‘Melo. Derrick Coleman? Sherman Douglas? Maybe that’s why the practice facility is already named the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center.Seven regular season titles with an abbreviated list of remarkable players leads me to believe that Boeheim is directly responsible for the school’s success.Jim Calhoun, a Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee himself, has encountered even more success than Boeheim, winning two national championships and six Big East championships over the course of his career. During those title runs, he has had the aid of several outstanding athletes such as Ray Allen and Richard Hamilton.But even with future NBA champions, winning two titles with distinctly different teams points to Calhoun as the reason why.The list of coaches in the Big East who have made a significant impact, not only in the conference, but also nationally, goes on.A rung down from the two Hall of Famers sits a group of coaches who have already found their own success in the nation’s toughest conference. Rick Pitino, whose mantra remains “shoot now, ask questions later,” has led three different schools to the Final Four (Providence, Kentucky and Louisville), a resume that seems to fit nicely with the rest of the conference’s coaches.Also in that second tier, Jamie Dixon, in his eighth year as head coach at Pittsburgh, has molded his team into a perennial high seed in the NCAA tournament; an impressive feat considering the Pittsburgh job is the first head-coaching gig he has held.Throw in Mike Bray of Notre Dame, the third-longest tenured coach in the Big East (behind Boeheim and Calhoun) and West Virginia’s Bob Huggins who, aside from his maligned reputation of failing to graduate his players, continues to produce deep tournament runs, and you come up with a wealth of accomplished head coaches unrivaled by any other conference in the country.But even then, the list of talented Big East coaches continues. Jay Wright of Villanova has led his team to six straight 20-win seasons with two Elite Eight and one Final Four appearance over that stretch. And the new coaches on the block, Buzz Williams of Marquette and Georgetown’s John Thompson III, have had early success as well.No other conference in the land has the collection of quality at head coach like the Big East. The ACC may have Mike Krzyzewski, Roy Williams and Gary Williams, but after that, the names read rather vapid. Again, the ACC is undeniably down this year.In the Big 12, after Bill Self and Rick Barnes, no one has proven themselves as a great coach. The verdict is still out on Frank Martin until he wins without Michael Beasley.The reason for the Big East’s dominance is clear: they have the best coaching. And the success of those coaches perpetuates the inflow of good players who want to play for a thriving program in the best conference in the country.last_img read more