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first_img June 10, 2019 Criminal Justice Reform,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – As Criminal Justice Reform Caucus members and guests spoke at a press conference today about reentry and reintegration, Gov. Tom Wolf commended the caucus for its bi-partisan commitment to commonsense criminal justice reform.“The caucus’ shared goal of advancing commonsense criminal justice reform is vital to giving those who have served their time a second chance,” Gov. Wolf said. “We know that effective reentry strategies reduce recidivism and increase public safety, and I commend the caucus for viewing this important, ongoing effort through a bi-partisan lens, focused on individuals, not political party.”Reentry and reintegration are priorities for Gov. Wolf, the Department of Corrections (DOC) and the Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole with programs in place to help inmates and parolees overcome barriers to post-incarceration success.Every year the DOC releases 19,000 individuals back into their communities following incarceration. DOC provides inmates with a variety of educational and vocational programs to teach them skills that they can use after incarceration to obtain and maintain life-sustaining jobs.Inmates who receive training while still incarnated have a better chance at success once released from prison.For those who don’t have a stable home environment to return to, the journey of reentry begins at one of dozens of community correction centers (CCC) throughout the commonwealth. The continuity of the services at these facilities can make the transition back into the community smoother for the reentrant.In addition to employment and housing, many reentrants suffer from substance use disorder and the DOC works to ensure access to community programs like mental health care, substance abuse treatment and support groups in order to successfully reenter into society. A collaborative effort with the Opioid Command Center is also underway to ensure reentrants have a bridge from treatment they’ve received in prison to community-based treatment and recovery services.Gov. Wolf has made criminal justice reform a priority, working with both sides of the aisle on multiple initiatives, including:• A Fair-Chance hiring policy for state agencies that removes the criminal conviction question, otherwise known as “banning the box,” from non-civil service employment applications for agencies under the governor’s jurisdiction.• Signing the “Clean Slate” bill, the first of its kind in the nation, to help those who have committed low-level offenses and have paid their penalty get back on the path to a blemish-free record, removing potential roadblocks to jobs, housing, health care, and education.• Signing Act 95 of 2018, eliminating driver’s license suspensions for non-driving infractions.• Signing Act 146 of 2018, extending the time a convicted individual has to file a post-conviction relief action to one year, from what was 60 days under current law.• Signing Act 147 of 2018, updating Pennsylvania’s DNA testing law to reflect significant advances in technology and the lessons learned by criminal justice professionals since 2002. The legislation removes the supervision requirement that only people serving a sentence can apply for DNA testing.• Signing Act 148 of 2018, a victim protection bill regarding housing options and emergency transfers.• Experiencing a record decline in the state’s prison population, while also experiencing a drop in crime.Gov. Wolf has also called for additional reforms, including passage and implementation of the Justice Reinvestment Initiative, or JRI 2, to address the high cost of incarceration in the state, to strengthen support for county probation programs, and to fix inadequate sentencing guidelines; reforming the pre-trial system to make certain that those accused of a crime have access to competent legal counsel and a reasonable bail system; and reforming the post-trial criminal justice system to ensure work towards rehabilitation of individuals and preparation to reenter society, rather than creating further risks for recidivism.“We all have a stake in helping give those who have paid their debt to society every possible chance to succeed when they return to their communities,” Gov. Wolf said. “Many of these bi-partisan reforms are doing just that and I look forward to seeing additional commonsense reforms come to my desk.” Gov. Wolf Commends Bi-Partisan Commitment to Criminal Justice Reformcenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

first_imgThe seconds crept by. Syracuse led by two. Clemson’s Marcquise Reed navigated inside the SU zone but there was nowhere to run. The Carrier Dome was awash with noise. Reed had a game-high 21 points to keep Clemson within reach.With the perimeter largely covered, he took it to the rack. Oshae Brissett swatted his shot. The ball trickled out of bounds, the clock trickling down with it. A “Let’s Go Orange” chant echoed in the building, and the 28,670 fans who had assembled on Saturday afternoon could finally exhale. Finally, they got the reprieve an SU team has offered every season since 1980-81: a win over a ranked team.In front of the largest on-campus crowd this season Saturday, it was supposed to be another home loss. It was supposed to be a seventh loss to a ranked opponent this season. Another anemic first half in which SU scored just 22 points made it apparent the Orange had regressed to its typical offensive efficiency. What it wasn’t supposed to be was a 55-52 Syracuse (19-12, 8-10 Atlantic Coast) victory over No. 18 Clemson (22-8, 11-7) to finish out the regular season with a much-needed signature win to add to its teetering NCAA Tournament resume.The upset would not have come if not for an 11-0 run that afforded the Orange the ability to go the final 8:45 without a field goal and still win. The run also helped the Orange avoid dropping its sixth home game this season. Syracuse finished the regular season having lost four of its last six, and SU will begin postseason play in the Barclays Center on Tuesday for the ACC Tournament. The Orange is 0-3 in ACC Tournament games since joining the conference, meaning Syracuse will need to flip the script and make a deep run to ensure it plays in the Big Dance.“We just have to play and see what happens,” SU head coach Jim Boeheim said. “It’s up to the Committee. It’s a tough call … we’ve got some good quadrant one and two wins, and we have no bad losses, and we won on the road, in tough places, at Louisville and Miami. We’ll see what happens.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFollowing Syracuse’s biggest victory of the year, Boeheim looked back on a season of twists and turns. He looked back to how Syracuse lost Taurean Thompson before the season. He looked back to the losses of guards Geno Thorpe, who left the program, and Howard Washington, who is out for the season due to injury. He reflected on Bourama Sidibe’s play, which has been mostly diminished due to ongoing tendinitis in his knee.“This team’s been playing with six guys,” Boeheim said.Before Boeheim pitched his case for Syracuse’s spot in the Tournament, before he reflected on what was originally supposed to be his final season at Syracuse, the Orange began its win over Clemson by regressing to the play that has proved costly of late. Twenty-seven seconds after tip-off, Boeheim got up off his seat, walked about 10 feet onto the court and gestured for a timeout. The Carrier Dome had gone silent following an SU turnover and Gabe DeVoe dunk. Yet despite almost no contribution from sophomore guard Tyus Battle, Syracuse entered the break down only 25-22. Two of the best defenses in the country played even through most of the first half and into the second, when Battle got going to spurt an 11-0 Syracuse run that allowed the Orange to not score a single field goal over the final 8:45 and still win. He drilled two 3-pointers and hit a floater, giving him eight points in three minutes. His floater tied the game at 30, giving him his 999th and 1,000th career points. Battle’s outburst coincided with Brissett’s, part of the run that put Syracuse up six. “We wanted to get the ball in his hands,” said Brissett, who had 17 points, six rebounds, three blocks and hit 8-of-9 free throws, many of them down the stretch. “We knew it was only a matter of time before he would go on that run. That’s what we want, get him in the flow of the offense. It made it easier for the rest of us.” Alexandra Moreo | Senior Staff PhotographerBattle entered the season well aware his role was to be the alpha male of Syracuse, the identity of a team with only one returning starter: himself. It became clear that he would have to do more than score. For SU to win, he would have to command the ball. Make steals. Compensate for an offense plagued by lack of depth with so-called hustle plays, steals and rebounds. And he knew he would have to generate motion, any sort of energy, for an otherwise flat offense.For most of the final minutes, the two teams jockeyed back and forth, with SU’s lead not exceeding seven and Clemson’s five. After Brissett made two free throws to push SU’s lead to two, junior center Paschal Chukwu made both of his free throws, sending the Dome into joviality. The Orange didn’t score from the field for nearly the final one-fourth of the game, but it didn’t matter, because SU’s run had already afforded it enough cushion. “I will not think that they should have done something more,” Boeheim said of Syracuse. “If anything, I would say they could have done something less than what they did. We’ll get ready. We’ll go to New York and try to play as well as we can.” Comments Published on March 3, 2018 at 4:24 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

first_imgCLEAR LAKE — Clear Lake High School’s graduation ceremony originally scheduled for this coming weekend will be held in June.A social media posting by the school district today says due to recommendations from the Cerro Gordo County Department of Public Health and the Iowa Department of Education, the high school graduation ceremony has been rescheduled to June 21st at 2 o’clock in the high school gymnasium. Graduation was originally scheduled to take place this coming Sunday.The Clear Lake School Board last month approved setting this Friday as the final day of the district’s school year.If you have any questions about graduation you are asked to e-mail high school principal Chris Murphy at cmurphy@clearlakeschools.orglast_img read more