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first_img View Comments See Maggie Smith & James Corden in Van Trailer We have our first look of Tony and Oscar winner Maggie Smith in the film adaptation of Alan Bennett’s The Lady in the Van. Check out the trailer below, which includes a scene-stealing cameo by Tony winner James Corden at the end! Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. London Sweeney Adds Date & Cast The Emma Thompson and Bryn Terfel-led Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, A Musical Thriller has added an extra date at the London Coliseum. Lonny Price’s production of Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s classic will additionally play April 5. Along with the previously reported Thompson, Terfel and Philip Quast, we also now know the show will star Matthew Seadon-Young, Katie Hall, Jack North, Alex Gaumond, Rosalie Craig and John Owen-Jones. NBC Taps Nicole Scherzinger We’re all hoping that Nicole Scherzinger will reprise her acclaimed star turn in London’s Cats revival on Broadway, but before that she will appear in a new NBC comedy variety series this summer. Hosted by Marlon Wayans, I Can Do That! will challenge the former Pussy Cat Doll and five other celebrities to put on an entertainment show with skills they didn’t even know they had. So Scherzinger won’t be belting or dancing then, as we all know she can nail both a key change and a tango. Tena Štivičić Wins Susan Smith Blackburn Prize The 2015 Susan Smith Blackburn Prize has been awarded to Tena Štivičić for her play 3 Winters. Štivičić collected the prize (and $25,000!) on March 2 at a celebration of the winner and finalists hosted by New York’s Playwrights Horizons. The honor is the oldest and largest prize awarded to women playwrights. Juliette Binoche & More Set for Kennedy Center Juliette Binoche is heading to Washington D.C.! Her previously reported international tour of Antigone has added a stop at the Eisenhower Theater as part of the Kennedy Center’s 2015-16 season. Directed by Ivo van Hove, the show will run October 22 through October 25. Also on the season’s slate is a production of The Bridges of Madison County. The short-lived but much-loved former Broadway tuner will play June 28, 2016 through July 17, again at the Eisenhower Theater. Meanwhile, stage faves Terri White, Randy Graff, Michele Lee, John Lloyd Young and Frances Ruffelle will headline intimate cabarets at the Terrace Theater.last_img read more

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today from the U.K. Fall Will Be the Age of Aquarius in LondonHope Mill Theatre’s production of Hair in Manchester, England won’t exactly cross the Atlantic sea, but it is genius genius enough to head to London. The revival will play off-West End venue The Vaults from October 4 through December 3. The production of the classic ‘60s musical, directed by Jonathan O’Boyle premiere at Hope Mill in November last year. Casting will be announced at a later date.New La Strada Adaptation Receives London PremiereA new stage adaptation of Federico Fellini’s 1957 film La Strada will head to London following a U.K. tour. The production, featuring music by Benji Bower and directed by Sally Cookson, will play The Other Palace in London from May 30 through July 8, after concluding its tour on May 27. The cast will be led by Cirque du Soleil alums Audrey Brisson, and Bart Soroczynski, as well as Stuart Goodwin. The movie, about a young girl sold into a circus to a brutish strongman, also inspired the 1969 BroadwayJudith Street Takes Center Stage in The GirlsJudith Street assume the role of Jessie in the West End production of The Girls. The stage veteran, who currently plays Lady Cravenshire in the Gary Barlow and Tim Firth musical, takes over for Michele Dotrice, who has been diagnosed with acute bronchitis. Street joins a septet of leads at the Phoenix Theatre that includes Debbie Chazen as Ruth, Sophie-Louise Dann as Celia, Marian McLoughlin as Marie, Claire Moore as Chris, Claire Machin as Cora and Joanna Riding as Annie.Stars Set for Lettice and LovageFelicity Kendal and Maureen Lipman will headline the previously announced London engagement of Peter Shaffer’s Lettice and Lovage. The Trevor Nunn-helmed production will run at the Menier Chocolate Factory from May 4 through July 8. Kendal, whose recent credits include the U.K. and Australian tour of Hay Fever and Relatively Speaking in the West End, will play Lettice Douffet, while Lipman, an Olivier winner for See How They Run, will take on the role of Lotte Schoen. Nunn is also set to direct Love in Idleness at the venue this spring. View Comments The Hope Mill Theatre production of ‘Hair'(Photo: Anthony Robling)last_img read more

first_imgChina expected to take lead in offshore wind capacity by 2021 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:The U.K., which now leads the world in offshore wind installations, will soon lose its title to China, despite plans to double its capacity by 2030. The analyst firm FTI Consulting expects China’s cumulative offshore capacity to pull ahead of the U.K. after 2021.That year, China is expected to have almost 10.9 gigawatts of cumulative capacity, compared to less than 10.4 gigawatts in the U.K. China has been catching up with the U.K. since 2017, when Chinese offshore wind installations breached the 1-gigawatt mark.From 2019 onward, FTI Consulting expects China to install 2 gigawatts per year, rising to 4 gigawatts annually by 2025. In contrast, the U.K. is not expected to reach 2 gigawatts per year until 2024.China’s advancement comes as the U.K. completed a number of prominent projects in 2018, including the world’s largest operational offshore wind farm, Walney Extension, which clocks in at 659 megawatts, plus the 573-megawatt Race Bank and 400-megawatt Rampion plants.Pointing to the scale of China’s ambitions, this month Jiangsu Province in eastern China was reported to have approved 24 offshore wind projects with a total capacity of 6.7 gigawatts, all due to come online before the end of 2020. The 122.29 billion yuan (USD $18 billion) investment is part of a plan called “Three Gorges on Sea” that aims to develop 10 gigawatts of offshore wind in Jiangsu, reports said.The Jiangsu projects approved this month are nearly six times as much as the 1.2 gigawatts of offshore wind power that China installed nationally in 2017, based on figures from the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC). They also represent more than twice as much capacity as the whole country had installed offshore at the end of 2017, which GWEC put at almost 2.8 gigawatts.More: China set to overtake UK as offshore wind leader by 2021last_img read more

first_imgThough each indoor track and field season for CNY Indoor Track Association sides starts with the Jack Morse Kickoff Meet, this one had a bit more meaning.That’s because the event’s namesake, Jack Morse, a long-time radio and television sportscaster who spent a large part of his four-decade career highlighting area high school sports, passed away in November at age 84.Baldwinsville’s indoor track team was part of the Thursday portion of this two-day event, and won both the boys and girls titles. On the way to the 1,600-meter team title in 19:51.98, B’ville was 1-2 individually, Jack Michaels taking the top spot in 4:42.21 to edge teammate Colin Delaney, who posted 4:43.10. That predated a sprint medley relay where Weaver, Sam Mellinger, Kenneth Svitak and Connor Waldron got a Bees victory in 3:53.02, the only time under four minutes.Quinn Peters, David Mahar, Logan Hayes and Robert Thompson went 1:42.24 in the 4×200 relay, just behind the winning 1:42.09 from Institute of Technology Central. Thompson and Aden Kostolecki were fourth in the long jump.Matt Komuda cleared 9 feet in the pole vault for third-place points. The Bees also finished fourth in the 4×800 relay in 9:41.89 and fourth in the 4×400 (4:08.76) as Tom Hagopian and Tom Bernardin got fifth place in the 55-meter hurdles.On the girls side at the Morse meet, the Bees also excelled at field events, including the pole vault, where Ella Smith’s clearance of 7’6″ meant an individual title and 10 first-place team points, too. In the weight throw, B’ville had three of the top four finishers, with Sarah Smiley heaving it 29’10” to beat Kathryn Mitts (27’2″) and Lauren Shaler (26’9″).Lauren Addario, by herself, got fourth-place points in the triple jump thanks to her individual victory with 37’3 1/2″. Hannah Johnson and Allyson Surowick paired for 29’7 1/4″ in the long jump, second to F-M (31’3 1/2″), while Karen Ekure and Natalia Lewis were second in the high jump, combining to top 9’3″.Vivian Holden-Betts, Sarah Fawwaz, Annabelle Horan and Sage Springsteen won the 1,500-meter four-runner event in 23:50.43, while in the sprint medley Addario, Ekure, Olivia Creelman and Anna Conklin were second in 4:53.19.Mary Sabatino, Lily Horan, Emilee Salzman and Catherine Thompson were third in the 4×800 in 12:13.58. Johnson, Brianna Natoli, Katie Nice and Bailey Nicholson got third in the 4×400 in 4:40.71 as Courtney Bostic, Madison Kennedy, Brook Wirtheim and Olivia Muscolino took third place in the 4×200 in 2:01.43.Elsewhere, Surowick and Nadia Kozman were fifth in the 55 hurdles, with Carlie Desimone and Alida Menickelli fifth in the 55 sprint. Shaler and Sarah Smiley were sixth in the shot put.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story The boys Bees had 94 points, well clear of Cazenovia’s runner-up total of 71 points, while the girls Bees got a scare from Cazenovia and Fayetteville-Manlius, yet won with 87 points to the Lakers’ 85 and the Hornets’ 84.Dominating field events, the B’ville boys had Ryan Dupra clear 6 feet 3 inches to win the high jump and gain team honors with Owen Weaver, who topped 5’6″. In the triple jump, Weaver and Aidan Priest prevailed with 75’5″, Weaver second among individuals with 39’11 1/4″.Steven Miller, second in the individual shot put with 39’2 1/4″, paired with Adam Graham for the team victory with 75’8 1/2″, while in the weight throw Miller (second) and Alex Boak (fourth) finished on top, their throws adding up to 81’2″.center_img Tags: Baldwinsvilleindoor tracklast_img read more

first_imgDES MOINES — As state ag officials work to create the rules for industrial hemp production, Iowa farmers are weighing whether the crop would be a good fit in their operations.Christopher Disbro, founder of the Iowa Hemp Association, says he’s excited about the opportunity for the state’s farmers who he hopes can begin growing the crop during the 2020 planting season.“It’s an emerging market and it’s an expanding market but there is a market for it and it’s that potential for growth where we want our farmers getting involved,” Disbro says. “In the beginning stages, a lot of the markets focused on the pressed seed oil that goes into beauty products or food products. There’s a lot of people using existing infrastructure to do fiber and textiles.”Dispro says industrial hemp has a wide range of uses and it holds many opportunities for the state’s growers.“Long-term, it’s not just food and fiber, it’s fuel, it’s bioplastics,” Disbro says. “It’s got real potential to be a really strong third rotational crop for Iowa and for Midwest farmers.”Studies find the production of industrial hemp could grow nationally to be a $1.9 billion dollar market by 2022, well beyond just fabric, fuel and rope.“I love a lot of the hemp beauty products, specifically the shampoos and hand lotions, they really make great product,” Disbro says. “We should never have to cut down another tree for paper. I try to use as much hemp paper as I can. It’s got a nice feel to it. It’s a little thicker, a little more substantial.”Governor Kim Reynolds signed the bill into law earlier this month to legalize industrial hemp production. Iowa farmers won’t be able to legally grow hemp until the USDA approves the proposed regulatory plan being created by the Iowa Department of Agriculture.last_img read more

first_imgThe keynote interview with award-winning Liberian novelist Saah Millimono, conducted by Hawa Jande Golakai, another young Liberian novelist, produced some startling, never-before disclosures about Millimono, leaving the audience sighing with inspiration as his debut novel, Boy, Interrupted, launched last Friday in Monrovia.Golakai, who also helped edit the manuscript for Boy, Interrupted, was also listed in 2014 as as one of Africa’s top 39 authors under the age of 40, is also a medical scientist.  Her own debut novel, The Lazarus Effect, has won several awards on the African Continent.“I feel great to be in conversation with Saah about this piece of literary work that has helped to expand Liberian history,” Golakai said.She added that one of the amazing things about Saah is that he improves on criticism and dedicates himself to his work.”If you want to write,” Saah told the audience, many of whom were high school students and aspiring writers, “you have to be patient.”  He speaks with a high-pitched voice distortion due to an apparent hearing impairment.  “Don’t rush.  Sometimes I sit for two hours to write, and I come up with maybe only three sentences… then I have to wait for a still, small voice in my mind to tell me what I should write.”“I have never had a family and since boyhood have had to live in different places and with relatives, until finally I started living on my own.”Saah attended the St. Kizito Catholic School, and then St. Michael’s, from where he graduated. From petty trading he tried to earn a living until he landed his first job at the Daily Observer newspaper as a literary columnist.The video of the full interveiw will be published online shortly. The Liberian Association of Writers (LAW), provided advisory support for the launch event.  Its president, Mr. Llord Aidoo, described Boy, Interrupted as “an architecture of history translated into literature.”Kate Haines, an associate editor of Kwani Trust, publisher of Boy, Interrupted and sponsor of the launch event, sent a message, read by Liberian writer, James Dwalu: “Because of the distinct quality of  the voice in which Saah wrote Boy Interrupted, the novel has received lots of acclaim from readers in and out of Nairobi.”The whole of Kwani Trust team has been impressed by Saah Millimono’s truthfulness and commitment to his writing… a story that takes us from the narrator’s difficult childhood years in Monrovia to a meeting with Kou, the beautiful girl who will change his life forever. Together they will witness their country’s descent into war and near cataclysmic destruction. Their love is tested by separation, loss, heartbreak, and emerges triumphant against all odds.”Bai Best, who has been an advisor to Millimono, said that “his style of writing stirs the reader’s mind and generates a thirst to know more.”Although Millimono is often misunderstood because of certain impairments he happens to have, the achievements he has made thus far demonstrate some important lessons for all of us to learn,” Best told the audience.He said further that Saah’s talent has taken him to lots of places that are not necessarily physical, but which no doubt enable him to add value to the human experience. Hookies Badio, who spoke on behalf of several students attending the launch said, that from the explanations about this novel, it is excellent piece of literature that should be made available for school consumption. Also in attendance were dignitaries from the Ministry of Education, the American Embassy, Stella Maris Polytechnic University, as well as officials of the Liberia Collective Societies and the Liberia Copyright Office.An excerpt of Boy, Interrupted is published in todays’ edition of LIB Life, the Daily Observer’s arts section.  Another excerpt will be read “in character” at Soul Sessions, a monthly open mic event held at Tides the Bar, on Friday, May 1. Copies of the novel will be on sale at the Soul Sessions event at $10 per copy.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more