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first_imgCrystal Hateley-Watson in her apartment in Fortitude Valley, which is one of Brisbane’s densest suburbs. Picture: Annette Dew.BRISBANE’S most crammed suburbs are getting even more crowded thanks to a high rise boom, increased migration and an emerging preference for inner city living.The latest figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed the 10 most densely populated suburbs in Greater Brisbane were all within 5km of the CBD, but city planning experts said that was not a bad thing. LIST: SCROLL DOWN FOR MOST CROWDED SUBURBS LIST It comes amid signs the inner city’s beaten down unit market is making a comeback, with the latest home value data released by property researcher CoreLogic revealing apartment values outperformed houses in Brisbane last month, as cashed-up Baby Boomers swap the suburbs for city life.Just 2km from Brisbane’s CBD, covering more than a square kilometre of prime real estate and with a median house price of just over $1 million, you’ll find the city’s most packed suburb — Kangaroo Point. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE Kangaroo Point is the most densely populated suburb in Brisbane, according to ABS.The riverside suburb is home to 9110 people, which worked out to be 6804 residents per square kilometre — that’s an extra 1154 people per square kilometre since 2007.On the other side of the Story Bridge, New Farm is the second most congested suburb in Greater Brisbane, adding 442 new residents per square kilometre over the past five years to increase from 6011 to 6453. GINA RINEHART SECURES $18.5M BRISBANE DIGS Balmoral has a population density of 3330, according to ABS figures.But Brisbane pales in comparison to some of the country’s most dense suburbs, with 19,500 people per square kilometre living in inner-city Melbourne and 16,300 residents per square kilometre in Potts Point in Sydney.The more populated a suburb, the better according to Steven Burgess, a consultant with engineering and transportation adviser MRCagney.Mr Burgess said high density areas were cheaper to run as a community, sharing infrastructure, services and assets. “Density is pretty good for cities,” he said.“The more stuff is closer together means people don’t have to drive far, it makes a city more efficient, more community focused, more socially sustainable.“What you’ve got to be careful of is that all your density doesn’t end up in one or two places in the city.” New Farm, the second most crowded suburb in Brisbane, is well-known for its cafe scene. Picture: Jamie Hanson.Neighbouring Fortitude Valley was the city’s third most packed suburb with 6288 people per square kilometre.It experienced the biggest jump in population density between the 2012 and 2016 Census, with more than 1800 people per square metre squeezing into the suburb in that time.In the past decade, it has become home to more than 2000 people per square kilometre. BRISBANE’S MOST EXPENSIVE HOME SALES Steven Burgess from MRCagney.Ethos Urban planning director Greg Vann, who was the project director for the Southeast Queensland regional plan, said two of the biggest generations were showing a distinct preference for inner city living.“Baby Boomers are downsizing and wanting to head back to where the buzz is, and Millennials are upsizing and wanting to stay close to the action,” Mr Vann said. “People are choosing to trade space for place.“Instead of having a bigger home further out, a lot of people are choosing to have a smaller home, but close to everything.”Mr Vann said that while the “high rise boom” in recent years in Brisbane’s inner city had contributed to population density, there remained a “missing middle”.“74 per cent of housing in southeast Queensland is still made up of detached houses,” he said.“It’s the stuff in the middle we need more of.” By that, he means townhouses and other forms of lower density, ground-oriented attached housing. “Those choices will be more attractive to people as housing needs change,” Mr Vann said.Mr Burgess said there was a significant difference between the population density in inner Brisbane and the middle to outer suburbs.“Once you get out of the inner city, you have to drive to do anything,” he said.“What I would love to see is the real revitalisation of the urban village (in Brisbane), so everyone didn’t have to come into the city to get to employment, night life, restaurants.”center_img Crowds of people in Queen Street Mall, Brisbane City.Real estate agents were also seeing a strong appetite from downsizers and millennial buyers for inner city housing.While some concerns remain about an oversupply of inner-city apartments, the high-end of the unit market is still in strong demand.Michael Bacon of Place Kangaroo Point said more buyers were looking for the convenience of having “everything at their doorstep”.“Another key factor is low maintenance,” he said.“They’re looking for something they can lock and leave.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoMr Bacon believed projects such as Queens Wharf would lure more people to inner city locations. “Once that goes up, people will be like ‘I want to be near that or have views of that’,” he said. There has been plenty of construction happening in Fortitude Valley. Picture: Richard Walker.West End has experienced the biggest increase in population density over the past decade, with 2083 additional people per square kilometre packing into the eclectic suburb since 2007.Even suburbs with under half the population density of frontrunners Kangaroo Point and New Farm are humming — Wooloowin-Lutwyche sits at 3424 people per square kilometre and Balmoral has 3330. BARGAIN PROPERTY IDEAL FOR INVESTOR Crystal Hateley-Watson in her apartment in Fortitude Valley, which is one of Brisbane’s densest suburbs. Picture: Annette Dew.Crystal Hateley-Watson rents a one-bedroom apartment in Fortitude Valley and loves the convenience of being able to walk to so many amenities and benefit from all the infrastructure in the suburb.Originally from Adelaide, Ms Hateley-Watson said she did find the inner-city suburb a lot busier and more populated, but doesn’t mind it.“Traffic’s crazy, but that’s Brisbane,” she said.“I think it’s a happy medium where I am.“I definitely see myself staying in the Valley, if I stay in Brisbane.”TOP 10 DENSEST SUBURBS IN GREATER BRISBANE(people per square kilometre at 2017)1 Kangaroo Point — 68042 New Farm — 64533 Fortitude Valley — 62884 Highgate Hill — 56225 West End — 55196 Spring Hill — 53637 Brisbane City — 47898 Auchenflower — 47179 Taringa — 434910. Annerley — 4244(Source: ABS)TOP 10 DENSEST SUBURBS IN GREATER BRISBANE(people per square kilometre at 2012)1 New Farm — 60112. Kangaroo Point — 58263 Highgate Hill — 52954. Spring Hill — 48565. West End — 45956. Auchenflower — 45487 Fortitude Valley — 44048. Brisbane City — 43569 Taringa — 403610. Annerley — 3934(Source: ABS)TOP 10 DENSEST SUBURBS IN GREATER BRISBANE(people per square kilometre at 2007)1 New Farm — 56812. Kangaroo Point — 5650 3 Brisbane City — 48934. Highgate Hill — 47125. Spring Hill — 46256. Fortitude Valley — 42507. Newstead — 42378. Taringa — 38089. Annerley — 355010. West End — 3436(Source: ABS)last_img read more

first_img For 45 minutes, Aston Villa seemed more than happy to let Sherwood go out with a bang and the away fans expressed their anger at the full-time whistle, with an uncertain summer also lying ahead at Villa Park. Tottenham enjoyed a positive start to the contest and created the first chance in the 10th minute when Adebayor slid a pass into the near post for Harry Kane, but the young striker’s shot was blocked by Villa goalkeeper Brad Guzan. Villa were struggling to establish a foothold as Spurs continued to pile forward and in the 14th minute the hosts broke the deadlock. Christian Eriksen’s quick pass allowed Gylfi Sigurdsson to feed Paulinho who saw his first shot saved but the Brazilian pounced on the rebound for his eighth goal of the season. Paulinho should have doubled the lead a minute later as Kyle Naughton picked the ball up on the right and fed the midfielder inside the box but he skewed his shot wide with only Guzan to beat. Villa were chasing shadows in defence as Eriksen and Sigurdsson continued to find pockets of space behind the Spurs front two. With 35 minutes on the clock, the home side doubled their advantage as Eriksen’s cross fell to Danny Rose who drove the ball to the near post and Baker, under pressure from Adebayor, turned the ball into his own net. The home fans had barely ended their celebrations before Tottenham were in again as Eriksen played Kane through but just as the striker was about to pull the trigger, Fabian Delph slid in to make an excellent block. The victory will do little to ease the disappointment of a fourth failed attempt at Champions League qualification but Tottenham at least gave their fans some cause for optimism thanks to first-half goals from Paulinho, Nathan Baker’s own goal and Emmanuel Adebayor’s penalty. Sherwood, whose name was not included once in Daniel Levy’s pre-match programme notes, seems to have revelled in an air of defiance since taking over at White Hart Lane in December and it was difficult not to see this rout as a final act of insolence towards his reportedly dissatisfied employers. Villa’s misery was compounded though two minutes later when a penalty was awarded as Sandro’s long-range shot struck the lifted arm of Gabriel Agbonlahor in the area and Adebayor stepped up to convert his 14th goal of the season. Michael Dawson could have even made it four before half-time but his header was saved by Guzan, who was perhaps the only Villa player to leave the field with any credit at half-time. The visitors started the second period with a greater determination to shut down Tottenham’s space, pressing the ball with far more intensity than they had in the first half. Delph went close shortly before the hour as he latched on to Agbonlahor’s cushioned header but drove his half-volley just wide of the post. The match drifted into the final 10 minutes with both sides seemingly happy to play the game out as chances dried up at both ends. One of the loudest cheers came when Sherwood gave a vocal Tottenham fan a club jacket and a place among the team coaches for the final five minutes of the match. Spurs fans will now wait to see who will be sitting on their bench at the start of next season. If this was to be Tim Sherwood’s final game in charge at Tottenham he left with a flourish as Spurs eased past Aston Villa 3-0 to finish sixth in the table and secure qualification for next season’s Europa League. Press Associationlast_img read more

first_img— Good grief, no one’s going to remember all of these do’s and (mostly) don’ts.— Some of the on-field social distancing measures, though well-intentioned, are going to be really challenging.MORE: Key points of Bryce Harper’s plan to save baseball in 2020Three examples from the AP’s report:Fielders are “encouraged to retreat several steps away from the baserunner” between pitches.First and third base coaches are not to approach baserunners or umpires(P)layers should not socialize with opponents.And now for some more rapid reactions:— First basemen are going to have to stay on the move as they shuttle between the bag and a few feet behind it when they’re holding runners. The middle infielders and third basemen won’t need to worry about this much.— It’s a decent bet that some first base coaches will forget to stay away. They unconsciously sidle up to baserunners after almost every pitch as they watch the third base coach give signs.— Old-school scolds might appreciate the return of the “No fraternizing” rule (hey, some levity can’t hurt).  Some of the voluminous hygiene guidelines may produce chuckles and maybe head shakes, but they mostly make sense. Among them: No spitting, finger-licking, high-fives, fist bumps or hugs; limit throwing the ball around the infield; dress at home or the hotel and come to the park ready to play; not too many people in the showers after a game.This reported guideline, though, was just confusing: “A ball will be thrown away after it is touched by multiple players.” That reads as though there will be a new ball for almost every pitch, when you consider pitches, foul balls, throws to bases and relays from the outfield. How many baseballs will be MLB need if that is indeed the case? MLB has put together 67-page first draft of social distancing and hygiene guidelines for team personnel to follow if there’s a 2020 season. The Associated Press got hold of the document and published some highlights Saturday.There were a lot of highlights. Two immediate reactions: MLB has asked teams to offer their input by May 22, the AP reported.”The document is designed to set minimum standards and identify best practices, but we have attempted to provide clubs with enough flexibility to achieve the desired health and safety objectives in a manner that is tailored to their particular circumstances, including ballpark configuration, location, and the nature of any local governmental regulations or restrictions,” deputy commissioner Dan Halem wrote in an accompanying e-mail to team owners and top executives.Expect lots of input, because there’s so much to review.last_img read more

first_imgHaving originally offered Fellaini only a one-year contract, United extended their deal by a further season and that was enough to convince the 30-year-old to remain at Old Trafford.Fellaini’s new contract has the option to extend for a further 12 months after the two years have expired.“I am pleased to be continuing my journey as a Manchester United player,” he told United’s website.“I made this decision because I am very happy here. Also, I feel like this team, under Jose, still has a lot we want to achieve.“I would like to say a special thank you to Jose (Mourinho) for the faith he has always shown in me.”Fellaini, currently on World Cup duty with Belgium, joined United from Everton in 2013, making 156 appearances and scoring 20 goals.He has won the FA Cup, the League Cup and the Europa League during his time with United.The towering midfielder is well liked by United manager Jose Mourinho, who insisted he always expected Fellaini to stay.“I am very happy Marouane is staying with us,” Mourinho said.“I always believed in his desire to stay with the club and I am delighted that he has signed a new contract.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Marouane Fellaini has signed a new contract with Manchester United © AFP / OZAN KOSELONDON, United Kingdom, Jun 29 – Marouane Fellaini signed a new two-year contract with Manchester United on Friday, ending speculation the Belgium midfielder would join Arsenal.Fellaini’s United deal was due to expire this weekend and Arsenal’s new boss Unai Emery was reported to have made an approach to sign him.last_img read more

first_img By Ron CowenAug. 24, 2017 , 2:00 PM The cuneiform inscriptions on Plimpton 322 suggest the Babylonians used a form of trigonometry based on the ratios of the sides of a triangle, rather than the more familiar angles, sines, and cosines. Email Daniel Mansfield holds the 3700-year-old Babylonian tablet that he and colleagues used to make their case. Trigonometry, the study of the lengths and angles of triangles, sends most modern high schoolers scurrying to their cellphones to look up angles, sines, and cosines. Now, a fresh look at a 3700-year-old clay tablet suggests that Babylonian mathematicians not only developed the first trig table, beating the Greeks to the punch by more than 1000 years, but that they also figured out an entirely new way to look at the subject. However, other experts on the clay tablet, known as Plimpton 322 (P322), say the new work is speculative at best.Consisting of four columns and 15 rows of numbers inscribed in cuneiform, the famous P322 tablet was discovered in the early 1900s in what is now southern Iraq by archaeologist, antiquities dealer, and diplomat Edgar Banks, the inspiration for the fictional character Indiana Jones.Now stored at Columbia University, the tablet first garnered attention in the 1940s, when historians recognized that its cuneiform inscriptions contain a series of numbers echoing the Pythagorean theorem, which explains the relationship of the lengths of the sides of a right triangle. (The theorem: The square of the hypotenuse equals the sum of the square of the other two sides.) But why ancient scribes generated and sorted these numbers in the first place has been debated for decades. Mathematician Daniel Mansfield of the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney was developing a course for high school math teachers in Australia when he came across an image of P322. Intrigued, he teamed up with UNSW mathematician Norman Wildberger to study it. “It took me 2 years of looking at this [tablet] and saying ‘I’m sure it’s trig, I’m sure it’s trig, but how?’” Mansfield says. The familiar sines, cosines, and angles used by Greek astronomers and modern-day high schoolers were completely missing. Instead, each entry includes information on two sides of a right triangle: the ratio of the short side to the long side and the ratio of the short side to the diagonal, or hypotenuse. UNSW/Andrew Kelly Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) This ancient Babylonian tablet may contain the first evidence of trigonometry UNSW/Andrew Kelly Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Mansfield realized that the information he needed was in missing pieces of P322 that had been reconstructed by other researchers. “Those two ratios from the reconstruction really made P322 into a clean and easy-to-use trigonometric table,” he says. He and Wildberger concluded that the Babylonians expressed trigonometry in terms of exact ratios of the lengths of the sides of right triangles, rather than by angles, using their base 60 form of mathematics, they report today in Historia Mathematica. “This is a whole different way of looking at trigonometry,” Mansfield says. “We prefer sines and cosines … but we have to really get outside our own culture to see from their perspective to be able to understand it.”If the new interpretation is right, P322 would not only contain the earliest evidence of trigonometry, but it would also represent an exact form of the mathematical discipline, rather than the approximations that estimated numerical values for sines and cosines provide, notes Mathieu Ossendrijver, a historian of ancient science at Humboldt University in Berlin. The table, he says, contains exact values of the sides for a range of right triangles. That means that—as for modern trigonometric tables—someone using the known ratio of two sides can use information in the tablet to find the ratios of the two other sides.What’s still lacking is proof that the Babylonians did in fact use this table, or others like it, for solving problems in the manner suggested in the new paper, Ossendrijver says. And science historian Jöran Friberg, retired from the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, blasts the idea. The Babylonians “knew NOTHING about ratios of sides!” he wrote in an email to Science. He maintains that P322 is “a table of parameters needed for the composition of school texts and, [only] incidentally, a table of right triangles with whole numbers as sides.” But Mansfield and Wildberger contend that the Babylonians, expert surveyors, could have used their tables to construct palaces, temples, and canals.Mathematical historian Christine Proust of the French National Center for Scientific Research in Paris, an expert on the tablet, calls the team’s hypothesis “a very seductive idea.” But she points out that no known Babylonian texts suggest that the tablet was used to solve or understand right triangles. The hypothesis is “mathematically robust, but for the time being, it is highly speculative,” she says. A thorough search of other Babylonian mathematical tablets may yet prove their hypothesis, Ossendrijver says. “But that is really an open question at the moment.”last_img read more