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first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today from the U.K. Fall Will Be the Age of Aquarius in LondonHope Mill Theatre’s production of Hair in Manchester, England won’t exactly cross the Atlantic sea, but it is genius genius enough to head to London. The revival will play off-West End venue The Vaults from October 4 through December 3. The production of the classic ‘60s musical, directed by Jonathan O’Boyle premiere at Hope Mill in November last year. Casting will be announced at a later date.New La Strada Adaptation Receives London PremiereA new stage adaptation of Federico Fellini’s 1957 film La Strada will head to London following a U.K. tour. The production, featuring music by Benji Bower and directed by Sally Cookson, will play The Other Palace in London from May 30 through July 8, after concluding its tour on May 27. The cast will be led by Cirque du Soleil alums Audrey Brisson, and Bart Soroczynski, as well as Stuart Goodwin. The movie, about a young girl sold into a circus to a brutish strongman, also inspired the 1969 BroadwayJudith Street Takes Center Stage in The GirlsJudith Street assume the role of Jessie in the West End production of The Girls. The stage veteran, who currently plays Lady Cravenshire in the Gary Barlow and Tim Firth musical, takes over for Michele Dotrice, who has been diagnosed with acute bronchitis. Street joins a septet of leads at the Phoenix Theatre that includes Debbie Chazen as Ruth, Sophie-Louise Dann as Celia, Marian McLoughlin as Marie, Claire Moore as Chris, Claire Machin as Cora and Joanna Riding as Annie.Stars Set for Lettice and LovageFelicity Kendal and Maureen Lipman will headline the previously announced London engagement of Peter Shaffer’s Lettice and Lovage. The Trevor Nunn-helmed production will run at the Menier Chocolate Factory from May 4 through July 8. Kendal, whose recent credits include the U.K. and Australian tour of Hay Fever and Relatively Speaking in the West End, will play Lettice Douffet, while Lipman, an Olivier winner for See How They Run, will take on the role of Lotte Schoen. Nunn is also set to direct Love in Idleness at the venue this spring. View Comments The Hope Mill Theatre production of ‘Hair'(Photo: Anthony Robling)last_img read more

first_imgOp Ed: It’s Time To Prohibit Self-Bonding By Coal Companies FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Caspar Star Tribune:This past month a completely unknown and unproven company called Blackjewel, LLC “bought” two of Wyoming’s oldest and biggest coal mines. More particularly, they were given the mines in exchange for assuming their cleanup risks and some hypothetical future royalties. They acquired the Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines near Gillette from another new and unproven company called Contura Energy, spawned just last year when Alpha Natural Resources went through bankruptcy and spun off what it called its “crown jewel” Wyoming assets. Now the crown jewels aren’t looking so shiny and Contura is unloading them at a loss because these mines are liabilities. Instead, Contura will concentrate on its metallurgical coal business in the East.Hopefully, the one thing that should not be a problem going forward is bonding to assure clean up and reclamation of the mines. Thanks to a settlement agreement with the Department of Interior during Alpha’s bankruptcy, Contura wasn’t allowed to self-bond. Instead of continuing to hide, as Alpha had done, behind the chimera of a self-guarantee – really nothing more than an uncollectible IOU — Contura was forced to back Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr’s reclamation work with surety bonds and letters of credit from third-party financial institutions. Blackjewel should be required to do the same as a condition of the sale before the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) lets them take over the mine permits. This would insure there will be money available for reclamation jobs if Blackjewel were to walk away from its cleanup obligations while these bonds are still in effect.The recent history of the Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr coal mines demonstrates one thing: their cleanup liabilities are nearly as high as (and possibly higher than) their value as operating mines. This loudly underscores that Wyoming regulators must not continue to allow self-bonding.If uncertainties and a down market continue to plague the coal industry as economists nearly unanimously predict, self-bonds will remain worthless promises and Wyoming will pay the price. Unless Wyoming prohibits them now, the next time mines change hands and weaker and weaker mine owners go bankrupt, we will not be so lucky.Self-bonding has no place in a regulatory scheme that was created to ensure the worst-case never happens. Taxpayers were never meant to be left holding the bag for hundreds of millions of dollars in reclamation work. America’s coal mining regulations were born in the late 1970s when abandoned and un-reclaimed mines were strewn across the country. Congress created an abandoned mine land fee to clean up past messes and required reclamation bonds to prevent future mines from being abandoned without reclamation. But the law also contained a loophole allowing states to accept self-bonds in the place of reliable third-party guarantees. Although Montana and other states showed the foresight to prohibit self-bonding, Wyoming became the No. 1 user in the country of self-bonding IOUs. Three years ago when Alpha, Peabody Energy and Arch Coal all declared bankruptcy, there was more than $2.4 billion of reclamation work in our state not covered by collectible insurance.With the lessons of these bankruptcies fresh in our memory, DEQ is considering an important step to update Wyoming’s reclamation bond rules. The update proposes to remove loopholes that allow companies to qualify for self-bonds when they really shouldn’t. DEQ’s proposed rules are an important change that would reduce risk to our citizens and our state treasury. Unfortunately, there will always be some risk from self-bonding until Wyoming totally eliminates the practice. As DEQ moves forward with their new rules, the agency needs to eliminate ALL self-bonding for ALL new coalmine permits and ALL permit renewals. Colorado has recently taken steps to limit self-bonding after the Peabody and Arch bankruptcies, and Wyoming should follow their example.–Bob LeResche is vice chair of the Powder River Basin Resource Council and a board member of the Western Organization of Resource Councils. He is a former commissioner of Natural Resources for the state of Alaska and executive director of the Alaska Energy Authority.More: Contura Sale Underscores Need to End Self Bondinglast_img read more

first_imgAudio Player00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. 1. “So our aim is to keep the cup, take the cup to the honourable commissioner (for sports) and onward to the number 1 man in the state, the governor.”In spite of whatever happened in Benin, Rivers Angels are still favourites for the AITEO Cup title on Wednesday and if they win, they will become the most successful team in the competition with seven titles. They are currently tied on six titles with Pelican Stars of Calarbar.However, Ibom Angels can draw inspiration from their male counterparts, Akwa United, who emerged winners of the men’s AITEO Cup on Sunday.The women’s AITEO Cup final will take centre stage at the Rwang Pam Stadium in Jos on Wednesday, October 18. 0:25 read more

first_imgThe “Bubba Rope” is a reference to the noose a Richard Petty Motorsports team member found in Bubba Wallace’s garage stall at Talladega Superspeedway on Sunday. Both NASCAR and the FBI investigated the matter and determined no hate crime had been committed against Wallace because the noose had been in place since October 2019.MORE: NASCAR explains its noose investigationFulp’s post was criticized in the comments section before it was removed.”This incident of racism is horrific and shameful,” said Ford Porter, the governor’s deputy communications director, via the Winston-Salem Journal. “North Carolina is better than this.” A spokesman for North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on Thursday condemned a racist Facebook post from the owner of a race track in the state.Mike Fulp, who owns 311 Speedway in Pine Hall, N.C., advertised a “Bubba Rope” for sale on Facebook Marketplace. The listing was posted Wednesday and removed Thursday, according to The Associated Press. It included the description, “Buy your Bubba Rope today for only $9.99 each, they come with a lifetime warranty and work great.” Mike Fulp’s “Bubba Rope” post https://images.daznservices.com/di/library/sporting_news/f5/12/bubba-rope-062620_1mrqz92vcdd4r16rv7yqy6u9rx.png?t=-243765054&w=500&quality=80311 Speedway is a half-mile dirt track located just off highway 311 in the north-central portion of the state.The Journal reported Saturday that 311 Speedway had lost a couple partnerships in the wake of Fulp’s post — one from a concrete company and the other from a driver series.NASCAR said the investigation into the noose found in Wallace’s garage stall revealed that it was placed at some point during its 2019 Talladega race weekend. Troubled by the fact that it was not alerted of the noose’s presence earlier, NASCAR is implementing industry-wide sensitivity and unconscious bias training and installing additional cameras in garages at its tracks.”NASCAR conducted a thorough sweep of all the garage areas across the tracks where we race,” NASCAR president Steve Phelps said Thursday. “So across those 29 tracks, and 1,684 garage stalls, we found only 11 total that had a pull-down rope tied into a knot.”And only one noose — the one discovered Sunday in Bubba Wallace’s garage.”MORE: All the facts of the Bubba Wallace noose case (Winston-Salem Journal) NASCAR has released a clear photo of the noose found in Bubba Wallace’s garage stall.https://t.co/DdkCWRvrA1— Sporting News (@sportingnews) June 25, 2020Wallace, 26 and the only Black driver in NASCAR’s three national series, has been taking heat for what was a misunderstanding on the part of his own Richard Petty Motorsports race team and NASCAR.”You get backlash every day,” Wallace said Tuesday night on CNN hours after the FBI and NASCAR announced the findings of their investigation. “I’m used to it. It stings a little bit worse when they’re trying to test your character.”Amid global protests of racial injustice, Wallace a few weeks ago led a group of drivers who pushed to have NASCAR ban the Confederate flag from tracks. NASCAR on June 10 did just that, announcing it would no longer allow the display of the flag at any of its events or properties.last_img read more