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first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ot-LpNEWJY” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/7Ot-LpNEWJY/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> While all groups spent the same 20 minutes face-to-face with physicians, blacks and Hispanics spent approximately 25 percent longer when seeking health care than whites, a result of increased travel, wait, and administrative times. Courtesy of Harvard Medical School Writing in the American Journal of Managed Care, the researchers reported that the average total visit time for a person seeking care for themselves, a child, or another adult was 121 minutes. That total includes 37 minutes of travel time and 84 minutes in the clinic. Of those 84 minutes, people spent only 20 minutes with physicians; they spent the rest of the time waiting, interacting with nonphysician staff, or completing paperwork or billing.Economists calculate the value of time spent doing an activity — known as opportunity cost — based on the income that an individual would earn working the same amount of time. The researchers calculated that the average opportunity cost per visit was $43, compared with an average out-of-pocket cost per visit of $32.“We also found that this time burden fell disproportionately on the disadvantaged,” said Kristin Ray, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.Writing in JAMA Internal Medicine, the researchers reported that, while all groups spent the same 20 minutes face-to-face with physicians, blacks and Hispanics spent approximately 25 percent longer when seeking health care than whites, a result of increased travel, wait, and administrative times. Lower-income groups and the unemployed also spent more time seeking care than their better-off counterparts.“Typically, when we talk about how much we spend on health care, we focus on what is paid to doctors and hospitals through co-pays and insurance payments,” said Mehrotra, who is also a physician and HMS professor of medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This work helps us put a dollar amount on the significant time it costs people to seek health care.”The researchers said that it is important to consider time costs when evaluating innovative treatment and care delivery models designed to create higher-value, more-patient-centered care and to reduce health care disparities. They noted that many initiatives currently underway might offer considerable benefits in reducing the time-cost burden of health care. These initiatives include streamlining office visits; incorporating clinics into schools, community centers, and places of work; and using new models of care delivery, such as telemedicine visits, e-visits, and other Internet-powered medicine.The researchers combined data from several sources to calculate time spent in transit, at the clinic, and with clinicians face-to-face. One key resource was the American Time Use Survey, which ties detailed reporting about how respondents spend their day in a given 24-hour period with demographic and income information. In 2010, people in the United States spent 1.1 billion hours seeking health care for themselves or for loved ones. That time was worth $52 billion.“That’s about the same as all of the time worked in a year by the entire working population of the city of Dallas,” said Ateev Mehrotra, associate professor of health care policy and medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Mehrotra is a lead author of two studies published this fall that measure the amount of time patients spend seeking care; calculate the total time costs to society; and analyze the difference in time burden by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.The hidden cost of health carelast_img read more

first_imgMore than 700 Harvard Extension School (HES) degree candidates and their guests gathered for the school’s second Convocation inside of Memorial Church this weekend. Students traveled from as far as China, Japan, the Netherlands, Brazil, and Canada, as well as from across the United States, to celebrate the event.As guests filled the pews to the sounds of the Radcliffe Pitches before the start of the ceremony, the degree candidates assembled for a group photo on the steps of Memorial Church alongside Dean of the Division of Continuing Education Hunt Lambert, HES Dean of Academic Programs Suzanne Spreadbury Ph.D., Ed.M. ’93 and HES Dean of Students Robert Neugeboren ’83 and the event’s speakers.An opening invocation was given by Interim Pusey Minister at the Memorial Church Professor Stephanie Paulsell who said she felt a special connection to the day’s event due to her decade’s long experience of teaching at HES.,Keynote speaker Ramon Sanchez, research associate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH), expressed his passion for teaching students at HES, who in many cases are simultaneously working while going to school.“All of you have earned your way into Harvard, and most of you did it while working full time and dealing with everything that life throws at you,” he said. “This Convocation is our way to thank you, for inspiring all of the Harvard community with your dedication, perseverance and faith.”Dean Spreadbury spoke about the diversity amongst the degree candidates, highlighting that students studying at HES come from 49 states, more than 50 countries and more than 100 are active duty or veterans in the military; “likely the largest admitted cohort of military students at the University,” Spreadbury said.,Newly elected Harvard Extension Alumni Association President Michael Fabiano A.L.M. ’16 welcomed the cohort into the HES family. He spoke about how his experience changed him and made him a better student and learner.“When you complete this program, you simply cannot leave without taking on the responsibility that this institution imbues upon you, to lead and make real difference,” Fabiano said. “Harvard challenges all of us, to create positive change in the world.”Dean Lambert capped the event by thanking the students for making his tenure as dean so fulfilling. This year’s convocation would be his last. Lambert announced his retirement last month and will leave his position in December.Lambert expressed how important it was to continue the progress they have made at HES. “It really is an incredible accomplishment that all of you have achieved and one important step in your life-long journey of learning,” he said. “What we have achieved at Harvard Extension, along with what you are working toward, is what it takes for Harvard to remain the great global university in the 21st century.”last_img read more

first_imgTo better sustain Georgia’s future peanut production, a University of Georgia peanut entomologist is surveying Georgia farmers.Notifications about the online survey were mailed directly to the more than 3,500 peanut producers in Georgia. The survey can be accessed online through a link on the Georgia Peanut Commission’s website at www.gapeanuts.com. “Insects, while not a huge problem every year like they were in 2014, can cause significant economic losses each year,” said UGA peanut entomologist Mark Abney. “The more information that researchers and Extension specialists at the University of Georgia have regarding the major pest problems growers face, the better off we are.”By knowing which pests growers are most concerned about, the standard practices growers use to control pests, and how well those control methods work, scientists like Abney can more effectively develop research and Extension programs to address the key questions and problems farmers face. Abney said the survey should take 5-to-15 minutes to complete. It features questions about insect pressure, production practices that can influence pest populations and pest management practices used on individual farms.“It’s very important for us to have that kind of information. For example, if only 10 percent of the peanuts in Georgia are being scouted, we need to know that when we write grants and ask for funding for Extension work to educate growers about the importance of scouting their peanuts. Being able to document IPM practices such as scouting is very important,” Abney said. Along with questions related directly to insects, the survey includes questions about production practices such as tillage and irrigation that can impact pest populations indirectly. The effects of tillage and irrigation on burrower bug populations are also included on the survey.Farmers who complete the survey will help Abney and his UGA colleagues understand what research and Extension work needs to be done and help them map patterns in pest activity across the state.“The data we gather from this survey will help us better understand what practices contribute to the risk of insect damage. There are only so many trials that can be conducted at the university each year, and not all pests will occur in our research plots,” he said. “Everyone is very busy this time of year, and we appreciate growers taking the time to complete the survey.”As an added incentive, every person who responds to the survey can enter to win a Stihl MS291 chainsaw. The drawing for the chainsaw will take place on June 30.last_img read more

first_imgAttorney General, October 14, 2011 The Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Unit, ordered former junkyard owner Gilbert Rhoades to clean-up the Milton site following its finding of environmental violations earlier this year, including removal of all tires at the site within 90 days. The Court ordered Rhoades to pay $20,000 in civil penalties and Rhoades and his wife, Blanche Rhoades, to reimburse the State $24,857.58 for past investigative costs. The Court’s ruling follows a May 11th hearing in an environmental enforcement action brought by the Attorney General’s Office based on inspections by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources.‘This ruling sends a strong message that, although salvage yards can provide valuable services to the community, owners of such operations must follow Vermont’s environmental laws and operate in a safe manner,’ said Attorney General William H Sorrell.In addition to ordering the removal of all tires at the site within 90 days, the Court ordered:permanently enjoined Rhoades from operating a junkyard or salvage yard at the site without first obtaining all necessary permits and licenses;ordered Rhoades to comply with all statutes and regulations governing the handling of hazardous waste;ordered additional soil sampling and removal of lead contaminated soil;ordered Rhoades and his wife Blanche to reimburse the State for $24,857 in past investigative costs; andordered Rhoades to pay the State $20,000 in civil penalties.Since November 2009, the Rhoades have been subject to a preliminary injunction prohibiting them from taking in any new junk, including scrap metal, at the site.Related documents:Ruling on DamagesRuling on the Merits (February 9, 2011)Ruling on Cross Motions for Summary Judgment (November 20, 2009)Ruling on Motion for Preliminary Injunction (November 20, 2009) last_img read more

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo December 04, 2017 Nice blog. I would like to share it with my friends. I hope you will continue your works like this. Keep up the excellent work. You have a magical talent of holding readers mind. It is something special which cant be given to everyone. Keep it safe 🙂 In just two operations, the Peruvian Navy (MGP, per its Spanish acronym) intercepted 971 kilograms of cocaine along the country’s coast. In the last months of 2017, MGP helped seize more than two tons of cocaine. On the night of September 30th, 2017, MGP found 700 packets of drugs in Los Órganos Beach, in the northern department of Piura. According to MGP, the maritime patrol ship BAP Río Cañete pursued a vessel that approached the beach and then fled when it noticed the patrols. The authorities seized 850 kilograms of cocaine wrapped in packets the size of bricks and placed in 20 black polyethylene bags buried in the sand. According to the authorities, the drugs came from the Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM, per its Spanish acronym) and were on their way to the United States or Europe through Ecuador. The authorities work under the premise that the merchandise could belong to a Mexican cartel, as the packets, worth about $25,000 on the international market, had the logos “Speedy Gonzales” and “Kuka.” During the operation, authorities arrested one person and seized a pickup truck and a recreational boat. The Counter Narcotics Executive Directorate (DIREJANDRO, per its Spanish acronym) of the National Police of Peru (PNP, per its Spanish acronym), with the support of MGP led the seizure. “When we have such information [about drug trafficking], we work together,” Peruvian Navy Captain Bruno Fatur Díaz, MGP commander of Coast Guard Operations, told Diálogo. “They [PNP] can give us information about our area of jurisdiction, and we can also gather data that’s reported to their area of intelligence.” Strike in Ilo In mid-September, MGP seized 121 cocaine packets aboard a Maltese vessel. The Dimitris C, a cargo ship moored at the port of Ilo, on Peru’s southern coast, hailed from Iquique, Chile, and was due to continue its voyage to the port of Guayaquil, Ecuador. “There was a tip, something suspicious was unloaded by some of the crew,” said MGP Commander Augusto Alzamora Olivari. “Although there were no specifics—it wasn’t exactly seen—the captain of the [Maltese flag] ship reported that there was something unusual going on in his vessel.” Based on that information, calls were made to the Attorney General, Customs, PNP, and others who worked with MGP. The ship search took 12 hours. At the end, authorities found three canvas bags and a briefcase containing 121 kilograms of cocaine. “We divided into two search groups,” Cmdr. Alzamora explained. “We took orders from the attorney general and worked in two teams with 15 people. One team remained on land so that no one could board, and the other carried out the inspection.” Intelligence and perseverance The mountainous jungle of VRAEM is the largest cocaine producing area in Peru, the world’s second leading cocaine producer. According to the National Commission for Development and Drug Free Living (DEVIDA, per its Spanish acronym), Peru’s antinarcotics organization, the region counts an estimated 55,000 hectares of coca plants. Drug traffickers continue to favor the maritime space to transport drugs. With a coastline of nearly 2,400 kilometers and dozens of ports, the threats to Peru’s coast are significant. An estimated 44 million tons of cargo passed through Peru’s public port terminals in 2016. Such high traffic makes it impossible to search each vessel. In addition, drug trafficking through ports increased due to criminal networks’ efforts to recruit port workers who help conceal and transport drugs. “When ships arrive, we do random inspections,” Cmdr. Alzamora explained. “Also, there are ships that stand by, waiting to see whether they want to unload drugs from the side of the ship instead of in port, because there are more controls in port—except when the staff has been compromised—but usually they try to unload it right off of the ship, at sea, to take it to another area.” MGP intercepts vessels at sea. “There [at sea] is where our guard ship operates, in addition to the personnel from headquarters who do random inspections,” Cmdr. Alzamora said. The intelligence work and cooperation among the various authorities involved in the war on drugs allows for the detection of vessels carrying illegal cargo and the fulfillment of their mission. “We don’t need any reward; it’s our job to combat these illegal activities in our jurisdiction,” Capt. Fatur concluded. “We do this as part of the government, together with all state institutions, as a single clenched fist.”last_img read more

first_imgby: Nick ClementsSeventy incoming college freshman told us that they have never been taught basic financial literacy skills. Yet, they are signing up for student loans, opening credit cards and making decisions that will have a serious impact on the rest of their lives. Why don’t we do more to help our children prepare for a financial world that can be extremely expensive when not understood properly?As a society, we spend a lot of time, money and effort helping prepare our young people for college. SAT preparation is a massive industry. And there are even consultants like Steven Ma, who will charge thousands of dollars to help students gain admission into the best schools.Yet, for some reason, we do not spend a whole lot of time educating potential college students on the less exciting topic of financial literacy, which is the elephant in the corner.At MagnifyMoney, we worked with Brooklyn College to design a basic course available to college freshman that focuses on four areas:The power of compounding interest.Your credit score and how it is calculated.How to understand the true cost of banking products and make informed decisions.The psychology of money and its impact on decision-making. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Less than half of non-retired Americans are confident they’ll reach their financial goals by retirement, according to a new survey conducted for the American Institute of CPAs.The survey, which was conducted by telephone among 1,018 adults aged 18 and over between March 24 and 27, found that 46% of non-retired Americans are confident they will reach their retirement goals, compared with 49% who are not confident (29% not sure, 20% don’t think they ever will). The survey sample included 650 adults self-identified as “non-retired” and 322 as “retired.”Only 5% of non-retired Americans reported that they had already reached their retirement goals.The study finds that this lack of overall confidence tracks with anxiety about the financial aspects of retirement – with two-in-five non-retired Americans (42%) saying they are either very anxious (14%) or somewhat anxious (29%).last_img read more

first_imgYour credit union’s culture is badA bad culture can kill any type of company – including your credit union.  One of the most prevalent things we see is a lack of communication in credit unions.  Whether it is letting your employees know about upcoming marketing initiatives or making sure important things are communicated effectively, communication goes a LONG way in improving a credit union’s culture, thus benefiting the marketing.   Brand experience doesn’t matchYour brand is not just your logo or your sign or your website.  While these elements are extremely important, a huge part of your brand is how others perceive your credit union.  If potential members are attracted by your marketing enough to take action and they call or come into your office and aren’t welcomed or your branch branding doesn’t match the marketing, the disconnect can cause people to distrust your brand. Here’s a tale of two credit unions.  Both are of equal size, with equal ROA, and equal lending/membership trends.  They have similar fields of membership in similar communities.  They are doing very similar things from a marketing standpoint.  But here’s the catch…Credit Union A’s marketing is really successful, but Credit Union B’s marketing is not getting many results.  How could that be?I regularly see situations like this.  Your credit union’s marketing efforts can be super beautiful with great messaging, a great brand story, and a great call to action.  So why is it not working?  Here are a few big things that significantly decrease the success of your marketing efforts:Your websiteWebsites should not be treated as a digital brochure.  Your credit union’s website is the online version of your branch experience.  It should be interactive, informative, easy to use, and in line with the rest of your brand experience – including your credit union’s marketing efforts.  If the marketing pieces/communications your members and/or potential members are seeing attract them to your website, make sure your website is on-brand as well.  If the marketing is well-executed but your website looks like something from 1997, it could cause you to lose business.    Not following the marketing planYour plan and corresponding budget may be approved, but if your credit union isn’t executing it or sticking to the strategy, marketing becomes stagnant and reactionary.  Be sure to give your marketing time to work and, if it isn’t working according to your projections, make adjustments to messaging, delivery channels, and budget.  Don’t just give up.  Like John F. Kennedy said, “There are risks and costs to action. But they are far less than the long-range risks of comfortable inaction.”  center_img 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Amanda Thomas Amanda is founder and president of TwoScore, a firm that channels her passion for the credit union mission and people to help credit unions under $100 million in assets reach … Web: www.twoscore.com Details Not making marketing a regular priorityWhile human resources, compliance and many other areas of your credit union have lawful requirements that need regular attention, marketing should also be something to which regular commitment is made.  From taking time to talk with your front-line employees about current initiatives to planning for the future, the more preparation and time you devote to marketing, the more successful your efforts will become.last_img read more

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first_img58 Carnarvon Av, Springfield Lakes.After more than eight years at their Springfield Lakes home Ajay and Shweta Jain are looking for a bigger property.The couple who have two children, aged 11 and 9, have loved living at 58 Carnarvon Ave. Mr Jain said he hoped to find a bigger home close to where they already live but with a swimming pool for their children.The four-bedroom, two-bathroom home on a 448sq m block has been repainted inside, new kitchen appliances and new grass in the backyard. 58 Carnarvon Av, Springfield Lakes.The Jains had been looking for the perfect property for a long time and said they liked this home in particular because the bedrooms were towards the back of the home providing plenty of privacy.Mr Jain said the home would best suit a young family.“We chose to live here because it’s a nicely developed area, and because of the schools,” he said.“There’s walkways, parks and tennis courts all around here.” 58 Carnarvon Av, Springfield Lakes.Electricity bills could be kept low with gas hot water and gas cooking.Mrs Jain said her two children loved the backyard and spent plenty of time outside.“It’s a private area,” she said.More from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 2019Mrs Jain’s favourite part of her home is the kitchen where she does a lot of baking for her home-based cake business.center_img The kitchen area at 58 Carnarvon Av, Springfield Lakes.The property is at the top of a hill on the highest position of the street.Ray White – Waterford selling agent Ash Chawla said there was plenty of space in the backyard to add a large trampoline for kids to play.Mr Chawla said the patio looked out on to the low maintenance lawn.The property is close to Regatta Lake, and Springfield Lakes Boulevard oval. The Carnarvon St home is being sold with offers over $479,000.last_img read more