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first_imgMore than 5,100 residents use a specialist at least once a year, 1,800 of which need the service of an ophthalmologist.Gala invitations can be picked up at any financial institution, and will be mailed out to more than 8,000 community members.The Be An Angel Campaign ends at 5:30 on December 1st, with a tree light-up at the local Hospital. – Advertisement – The 13th annual ‘Be an Angel Campaign’ kicks off next week.To celebrate, Fort St. John City Council proclaimed November as Fort St. John Hospital Foundation month.The Angel Campaign begins on November 1st with a community gala. Fund Development Officer Ashley Bentley says the money goes toward its Visiting Specialist Campaign, which brings nine different specialists to the community.[asset|aid=2056|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=2a658c3ff4aa36bf49fccb5108d67959-Bentley 1_1_Pub.mp3]The funds will allow the foundation to purchase new equipment for specialists, in hopes of attracting more specialists to the area.[asset|aid=2057|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=2a658c3ff4aa36bf49fccb5108d67959-bentley 2_1_Pub.mp3]Advertisement Photo: Acting Mayor Don Irwin hands Ashley Bentley (right) and Janice Isberg (left) the proclamation on Monday night – Chirstine Rumleskie/Energeticcity.calast_img read more

first_imgThe Belgian is satisfied with what he was able to achieve as an individual at the club, but is determined to help United claim silverware next term.“For me it’s always down to work,” he told the press while on duty with Belgium ahead of the World Cup in Russia.“I know I have some talent, but for me it’s about the work I do every day with my club. I try to improve myself every day and to learn from my past matches.“I think for myself individually it was a good season but as a team we didn’t win anything. That’s what hurts. But that’s something that we’re going to try and change next season.“I’m looking forward to seeing our squad with a few reinforcements next season, and to try and win the league and other trophies too.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000LukakuLONDON, United Kingdom, May 31 – Manchester United striker Romelu Lukaku says he is happy with his overall performance this past season but admits he wants trophies next year.The 25-year-old joined Jose Mourinho’s charges from Everton in July last year and made 51 appearances in 2017/18, scoring 27 goals and providing nine assists across all competitions.last_img read more

first_imgThe Britannia Stadium is more Spanish than Stoke-ist these days following the arrival of a host of star names from La Liga.But the language barrier can make things difficult in a dressing room. So what are the Stoke lads doing about it?Charlie Adam revealed on the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast on Wednesday morning that goalkeeper Shay Given had been spotted using a Spanish language app after training, but what about the Scottish midfielder himself? Can he make himself understood when chatting with Bojan and co?We decided to put his linguistic skills to the test…last_img read more

first_imgSimon Clare joins the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast to round up the latest sporting odds.The Coral spokesman looks ahead to Crystal Palace v Sunderland on Monday night, revealing the Eagles are 4/7 for the win, with the struggling Black Cats big outsiders at 11/2.He also discusses Jamie Vardy’s stunning form and says the Leicester striker is 6/4 to score for an 11th successive game, and break Ruud van Nistelrooy’s Premier League record in the process, against Manchester United this weekend.Clare also assesses the title race, and reveals Tottenham are 20/1 to top the table come the end of the campaign following their stunning run of form.Coral is the official betting partner of the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfastlast_img read more

first_imgJuventus have never considered selling Chelsea and Barcelona target Paulo Dybala, according to CEO Beppe Marotta.The Argentine has been in great form since joining from Palermo in the summer and has been linked with a move away from Italy when the transfer window reopens.But Marotta is adamant Dybala will stay in Turin.“Dybala was a conscious decision, but risky,” Marotta said when asked about signing Dybala on Gr Parlamento.“We knew we had chosen a very important talent, able to represent the future of the club. Moving from Palermo to Juve is a big jump.“The lad has taken that step in the best way. He can still give more, he’s one of the best players out there.“It’s never entered Juve’s head to sell him.” Paulo Dybala 1last_img read more

first_imgWhen I first meet a potential client I go through a consultation process. During this I always ask them their goals. Quite often the client will have a number of goals that they want to achieve. These can range from being healthier, losing a few pounds, having more energy or getting in shape for a holiday or wedding.I will always ask them to pick the one that is their overall goal and that they want the most.99% of the time the goal will always be weight loss and muscle ‘tone’. This allows me to plan out a strategy that can best help them reach their goals in the time frame that they are thinking of.When a person decides to set out a goal for themselves, and the goal is weight loss, they will usually take the path of least resistance.Quite often that path will be running.They choose it because it’s free, anyone can do it and you don’t need any equipment. To me, running is not an entry level activity for someone who is currently sedentary or overweight.With each foot strike you are putting 2-3 times your bodyweight through your hips, knees and ankles.So if we take someone who is 18 stone, with every foot fall they are putting between 36 and 54 stone of pressure through their joints.Alwyn Cosgrove gives a great analogy.‘’Imagine that you’re just starting a fitness program, and you ask a trainer for advice. ‘’Here’s what I want you to do on the first day’’, he says. ‘’Hop 750 times with your right leg. Then hop 750 times with your left leg’’ Would you do it?Of course you wouldn’t! Who in their right mind would class this as exercise?So you refuse to do it. ‘’Okay the trainer says, do 750 hops, but alternate legs and move forward while doing it.”You try it and realise that it feels a lot like running and that’s because it is running. Why 750 times? It’s because that is what it usually takes to run one mile… 750 foot strikes per leg, 1500 in total.That is an enormous amount of pressure to be putting on someone who has never exercised before and whose joints may already be in a stressed state due to being overweight.Now, let me make this clear. I have nothing against running. I have the utmost respect for anyone who has the physical capacity to do long distance running, but we have to go back to our goals.Is your goal to be a runner?If it is then the answer is easy, you have to run.Is your goal to burn fat and ‘tone’ muscle?Then running is not the most optimal way to do this.Yes you can lose weight through running, but if you are a certain body shape you will just end up a smaller version of the shape you are now.If you want to change the shape of your body you have to do some sort of resistance training.This doesn’t mean you have to start off by going onto the dreaded ‘black matted area’ of the gym, where all the angry looking guys hang out. (We’re not actually angry; some of us just need a hug!)Use a few basic bits of equipment such as a step, a simple set of dumbbells and a set of resistance bands.Add in some bodyweight exercises such as squats, push ups, lunges and planks and you can put together a full body workout that can get you great results.#TrainSmartFor further information on Personal Training and Nutrition you can contact me through the link below.https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rushe-Personal-Training-and-Performance/120518884715118* Emmet is the owner and operator of Rushe Personal Training and Performance.EMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: WEIGHT LOSS – TO RUN OR NOT TO RUN? was last modified: March 3rd, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:emmet rushefitness columnRunninglast_img read more

first_imgAstronaut Mandla Maseko will feature in the next instalment of Brand South Africa’s Play Your Part TV series, to be aired on Sunday 20 July at 9pm on SABC2. Maseko won the global Axe Apollo Space Academy competition for an hour long sub-orbital trip of 62 miles, or about 100 kilometres. Handpicked for the trip on the Lynx Mark II Spaceship, Maseko is one of only 23 civilians from around the world to win a seat on the space mission. He saw off a million other entrants to emerge victorious. (Image: Sthe Shabangu)• Brand South Africa+27 11 483 0122info@brandsouthafrica.com• South Africa takes to space • Ubuntu coming to phones• Blast-off for space weather centre • Ubuntu beats Windows and Mac • From township to space, the world’s first black African astronautMelissa Jane CookIt is an extraordinary dream come true. Like music to Mandla Maseko’s ears, this part-time DJ will blast off into space, literally. No-one in Maseko’s family has ever stepped outside South Africa, but now the 25-year-old is preparing to rocket into space in 2015.Maseko won the global Axe Apollo Space Academy competition for an hour long sub-orbital trip of 62 miles, or about 100 kilometres. Handpicked for the trip on the Lynx Mark II Spaceship, Maseko is one of only 23 civilians from around the world to win a seat on the space mission. He saw off a million other entrants to emerge victorious.The son of a toolmaker and a cleaning supervisor, he hails from the dusty Mabopane Township near Pretoria. He will be the first black African, and the only other South African besides billionaire Mark Shuttleworth to have gone into space. Shuttleworth is a white entrepreneur and philanthropist who bought a seat on a Russian Soyuz capsule for £12-million and spent eight days on board the International Space Station in 2002.“Excitement does not begin to describe how I feel right now,” Maseko told the Pretoria News daily. “If there was a better word than ‘excitement’ I would use it.” He was forced to put his civil engineering studies on hold because he could not pay the fees; now will get to experience zero gravity and a journey that normally comes with a $100 000 price tag.He heard the news of his achievement on 5 December 2013, only a few hours after the death of Nelson Mandela. “I have run the race and completed the course, now here is the torch,” Maseko imagined Mandela would have said to him. “Continue running the race and here’s the title to go with it.”Watch Mandla Maseko discussing his once in a lifetime opportunity:Entering the competitionIn August 2013, Maseko was lying on the couch when he heard an advertisement for the competition on the radio and decided to enter, along with thousands of other South Africans. “I needed to send in a picture of myself jumping off something. I jumped off the wall in the backyard. I had to do it three times before I was happy with the picture.” His motivation for entering, he said was because he wanted “to defy the laws of gravity”.Hopefuls from more than 105 countries competed for a spot on the shuttle. Only 30 entrants from South Africa were selected from a field of 85 000 determined individuals for the first set of challenges in Free State; they were cut down to three, who went to the US for further gruelling preparations. Maseko was among them – one black, one white, one of Indian origin. “We wanted to show South Africa is way past the colour of our skin. We are the human race.”From December 1 to 8, Maseko and fellow South Africans Dean Roddan and Haroon Osman faced arduous challenges at the Kennedy Space Center in Orlando, Florida. This would test their resolve, strength and courage.While at the Axe Apollo Space Academy, Maseko engaged in a series of missions that gave all recruits a taste of the thrills and trials faced by real astronauts. Among training missions, he learned to pilot an Air Combat USA aircraft and braced himself for the strength of blast off in a G-Force Simulator at the Kennedy Space Centre Visitor Complex.Other challenges included skydiving, building and launching a rocket and conquering obstacle courses. “Unfortunately we could not get our rocket to launch, but we made up points because we were judged on bravery, enthusiasm and teamwork,” Maseko said. “We face things head on. I knew I had to learn, master and excel at the challenges, so I did.”Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, was one of the competition’s judges, and Maseko got the opportunity to meet Aldrin when he was announced a winner. “I got to shake his hand three times. I was like, ‘Oh, is this you?’ He said, ‘Yes, it is me!’” For Maseko, the encounter was magical. “This is how it feels to be out in space,” he thought.Aldrin is among 12 people – all American, all men and all white – to have walked on the moon. But Africa has growing space ambitions: the majority of the Square Kilometre Array, the world’s biggest and most powerful radio telescope, will be spread across South Africa and eight other countries on the continent.Watch Mandla Maseko discussing Space Jump Suits:Destined for greatnessHe was a “typical ekasi township boy” who still lived at home with his parents and four siblings, said Maseko. His father, who grew up in such poverty that he got his first pair of shoes when he was 16, was determined that his children would never go hungry. “I don’t remember going to bed without having eaten,” he said. “My dad provided for us. He is my hero, and then Nelson Mandela comes after.“I’m not trying to make this a race thing but us blacks grew up dreaming to a certain stage. You dreamed of being a policeman or a lawyer, but you knew you wouldn’t get as far as pilot or astronaut. Then I went to space camp and I thought, ‘I can actually be an astronaut.’”But he had known since he was a boy that he was destined for greatness. “We were not brought up to believe we can be bigger than big, but I always knew I would be.” His mom, Ouma Maseko, agreed: “When I was pregnant with him in 1988, I knew I would give birth to a star,” she said.The young Maseko’s imagination was fired by the science fiction series Star Trek and films such as Armageddon and Apollo 13. “I thought, that looks fun. No matter what life throws at you, you can use it and come out on top. If you get lemons, you must make lemon juice… My life has taken a total turn and this is my big break. People will be telling their children and grandchildren that I was the first black South African youth in space.”Plans for the futureDuring the long wait before his trip, Maseko hopes to complete his civil engineering qualification. One day when he had money, he said, he wanted to pay for the education of a child from his area. This humble boy has been offered a gigantic launch pad and the ability to defy the laws of physical and political gravity. His long-term plans are to study aeronautical engineering and qualify as a space mission specialist with the ultimate dream of planting the South African flag on the moon.“South Africa has come a long way. We have reached a stage where we are equal and we are one. This year is the 20th anniversary of democracy and what better way to celebrate than sending the first black South African into space?”The idea of making history when South Africa celebrates 20 years of democracy, appeals to him. “The vision of all youths here in Mabopane is to drive a taxi, do drugs or work on houses. It’s good to be a solution to your township rather than a problem. I want to break that system and this is a nice way to go down in history. I believe that will motivate me. The sky is not the limit.”Derek Hanekom, the minister of science and technology at the time – he became tourism minister in May this year – saw Maseko as a role model for “the future generation of space professionals and enthusiasts”. His experience could not have come at a better time than “when Africa is gearing up its space ambitions” as host to the world’s biggest and most powerful radio astronomy telescope, said Hanekom.The director of that project, Bernie Fanaroff, also hailed Maseko as an ambassador for science. “Anything that raises the profile of science up there must be good because it brings to the attention of young people what they can achieve in science and engineering.”It is a big responsibility, but the last word must go to the spaceman himself: “I have had to learn so much about astronomy and space to teach others. It’s been a dream, a lifetime dream come true, and I don’t want to stop here. When I come back, I want to become an astronaut and I will work hard to get there,” he said.last_img read more

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Farmers keep a close eye on the yield monitor as their combines roll across the field. GSI (Grain Systems, Inc.) recommends that growers also monitor their grain storage system during harvest and rate its performance once the season’s over.“Evaluating how well their grain system handled the harvest season, and what improvements may be needed, is one of the most important steps farmers can take to help prepare for next year,” said Gary Woodruff, GSI conditioning applications manager.Woodruff suggests farmers keep track of any grain handling, drying or storage issues, and then give their grain system a post-harvest “report card” based on the following considerations:Material handling: How well did grain handing equipment – dump pits, grain legs and other conveyors – perform in loading and unloading of grain? If bottlenecks were experienced, consider adding faster, higher-capacity handling equipment for next season.Dryer capacity: Ideally, grain should be dried the same day it is harvested. If wet grain remained in a hopper tank longer than one day, plan to add drying capacity next season to protect grain quality.Grain storage capacity: Did grain bins have adequate storage for the bushels harvested? If not, and it was necessary to transport more grain than expected to an elevator, expanded storage may be a wise investment for 2018. Hauling grain to an elevator not only entails storage costs, but may also can take time away from harvest for transportation.Safety: Post-harvest is also a good time to consider possible system enhancements, such as improving safety. This can include installing roof stairs or peak platforms on bins, checking to see if bin safety cages are secure, and making sure all safety shields on motor drives and dump points are in good condition.Maintenance: Grain bins and dryers should be thoroughly cleaned of debris as soon as they are empty and the entire storage system inspected, so that all equipment will be ready for next season. Common maintenance needs can include repairing and/or replacing worn motors and belts, damaged down spouts, noisy gear boxes, worn flights on augers and oil leaks.“The off-season is a much better time to address these issues, rather than waiting until the busy spring or summer periods, when dealers are booked and required parts may be difficult to find in time for harvest,” Woodruff said. “Farmers know the importance of inspecting and cleaning their combine following the harvest season. It’s just as important to evaluate their grain system to be sure it will efficiently meet their storage needs for next season.”For more information, farmers can contact their GSI dealer or visit www.grainsystems.com.last_img read more

first_imgThe owners like the Passivhaus approachPaul and Diane Honig weighed their options carefully before undertaking the project and considered buying and renovating as well as new construction. In the end, the Passivhaus approach held the most appeal.“I had read about the whole concept of Passivhaus in The New York Times — I don’t know, five years ago — about a house being built in Germany, and I thought it was kind of a cool idea,” Paul said. “I liked the idea that you make an investment up front and you get paid back in three ways: you have a more comfortable place to live, you save money in reduced energy costs, and you do something good for the environment. It seemed to make a lot of sense to me.”And as far as choosing Passivhaus certification over a less stringent but still energy-efficient design, he said, “If you’re going to do it, you might as well do it. And since we were starting from scratch I don’t think it was that much extra effort to get the house to perform to the Passivhaus standard.”Diane was especially drawn to the indoor air quality and comfortable temperatures the design promised, in part because she grew up in New York City apartments were no one really has any control over the indoor air environment. “There are so many quality-of-life benefits to Passivhaus as well,” she says. “That was one of the things I liked about Passivhaus specifically, rather than just a ‘green’ house that lots of green aspects to it.”The Honigs were in the house when Hurricane Sandy struck last fall, and lived through a couple of blizzards this past winter.“The interesting thing was the quiet,” Diane says. “It was eerily quiet. Where other people told me it sounded like there was a freight train coming through their house during the hurricane, we heard little tippy-tapping of rain on the windows, occasionally. It was weird. We were looking outside watching the trees blow 10 feet in each direction and we didn’t hear a thing.” A 3,561-sq. ft. home in Harwinton, Conn., is the state’s first certified Passivhaus and the overall winner of the 2012 Connecticut Zero Energy Challenge, a statewide design/build competition that recognizes energy-efficient building practices.The three-bedroom house was designed and built by Wolfworks Inc., of Avon, Conn., and incorporated a variety of features to help it meet the Passivhaus standard for low energy use and low rates of air infiltration.In addition to winning the Connecticut Zero Energy Challenge, the Harwinton house also won three of the four contest categories, including the lowest HERS index (-12), the lowest projected annual net operating cost ($64), and most affordable project ($169 per square foot).Homeowners Diane and Paul Honig moved in last October. Some of the highlights detailed by builder Jamie Wolf:A double stud wall consisting of two 2×4 stud walls separated by 5 inches of rigid foam insulation (4 inches of expanded polystyrene and 1 inch of polyisocyanurate) sheathed with Zip System OSB.Dense-packed cellulose insulation in the walls and 24 inches of loose-fill cellulose in the roof trusses.Raised-heel roof trusses.Triple-glazed tilt-turn windows.Windows with a high solar heat gain coefficient on both the north- and south-facing walls.A photovoltaic system with a rated capacity of 10.5 kW and a homeowner-built solar domestic hot water system.Ducted minisplit heating and cooling and a heat-recovery ventilator. Rigorous building practicesWolf went to great lengths to limit air infiltration, including the use of EPDM sill seal, air-sealing tapes around windows and on sheathing seams, and a layer of taped sheathing on the bottom of the roof trusses as an air barrier. Builders were rewarded with very low air leakage: the blower-door result was 0.34 air changes per hour at 50 pascals. That’s far below the Passivhaus threshold of 0.6 ach50.The insulation values were equally impressive: R-28 slab, R-32 foundation, R-46 walls, and an R-83 roof.If you’re interested in learning more about the house, there are at least three good sources of information: a blog written by Diane Honig, the website for Wolfworks, which also includes a very detailed description of the project written by Wolf, and the website for the CT Zero Energy Challenge.Wolf says the project was his first net-zero house and the first Passivhaus design that went all the way through construction (he designed a couple of Passivhaus projects earlier but they were never built). Wolf started as a house painter, then got into remodeling. Eventually he became interested in Passivhaus construction, “drank the Kool-Aid,” and became a certified Passivhaus consultant. Because of that certification, the Honigs contacted him.last_img read more

first_imgThis post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet.One way to make your job in leadership infinitely more difficult while ensuring you fail to develop your people is to turn them into dependents. There are two things that leaders do that kill initiative and resourcefulness and turn employees into dependents.Doing Their WorkThe presentation or report the client needs is important. It must be done right, and it needs to be your company’s best work. One of your employees explains to you what your client needs and, heroically, you spring into action. You can do a better job than the employee who just received the request. And you want to personally make sure it’s done right.You may be capable of doing a better job on some tasks than the person you believe you are helping, but by doing the work for them you deprive them of the experience of doing the work themselves. You have eliminated their opportunity to learn how to do whatever it is that you have decided to do for them.You’ve also demonstrated that you aren’t confident that they can do the work. Without saying a word, you have shown your employee that you don’t believe they are capable.By doing the work yourself, you may produce a better result, but you haven’t given the person whose work you are doing the learning experience or your confidence in their abilities. In the future, you can count on that person (or persons) coming back to you again and again to do the most important work.By doing the work, you’ve created a dependent.Answering Their QuestionsYour salesperson is stuck. They have a challenging opportunity, and their dream client is stretching them to the very end of their ability. They rush into your office with questions and, being the wise old sage that you are, you start doling out the answers.Sometimes you may need to provide your employees with the answer to challenging problems. But doing so as a standard operating procedure creates dependents. You are doing their thinking for them instead of teaching them how to think. Instead of notching them up, you are limiting their growth. Worse still, your taking their pinkish-gray matter out of their work.Non-directive coaching is a much more powerful choice for engaging with members of your team around challenges. By making your employees answer the questions for themselves, with your help and guidance, you are teaching them to think. Your notching them up instead of creating dependents.Slow is Fast, Fast is SlowIt’s faster to do the work yourself or to provide someone with what you believe is the right answer. Way faster. But way faster equals way slower. It slows down the personal and professional growth of the person you are helping. And it slows down your ability to really help, continually burdening you with more and more work from the dependents you’ve created. That’s why fast is really slow.Slow is fast. The more time you take to coach, train, teach, and develop, the faster your employee’s grow personally and professionally. By taking time now, you eliminate the need to take the time to do the work and provide the answers in the future. This increases the speed of your team, and it provides you with the time you really need to lead. Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Nowlast_img read more