Archives : Jun-2021

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Kirby Myhill(Scarlets)Kirby Myhill – ScarletsMatthew Rees’s injury and Ken Owens’s World Cup call-up meant teenage hooker Kirby Myhill was fast-tracked into first-team rugby at the Scarlets this autumn, sharing the No 2 jersey with Emyr Phillips. And the Wales U20 player has risen magnificently to the challenge.Picked out by national U20 coach Richard Webster as a “hard-working, talented player”, Myhill has impressed Scarlets boss Nigel Davies too: “He needs to work on his technical aspects but his all-round rugby ability is exciting.”It’s hardly surprising that parts of Myhill’s game need work. At just 19, he’s only been playing hooker for a couple of years, having switched from the back row at U18 level at the suggestion of Scarlets Academy manager Kevin George.Myhill’s uncle, Mark Perego, won nine caps at flanker for Wales in the early 1990s and his younger brother Torin played for Wales U16 last season. Kirby learned his rugby at Burry Port and Coleg Sir Gâr, then turned out for the Scarlets and Wales at U16 and U18 level.Last season he made his Scarlets debut off the bench and played half-a-dozen games for Llanelli, but this season he has been with the region’s first team full-time.Senior team-mates like the injured Rees have been a big help and Davies hopes he will make the most of it. “Players need role models and he’s got a Lion in Matthew Rees. You don’t become a Lion by chance. It’s talent but a lot of hard work too and he can learn that from Matthew.”Rugby World Verdict: A good attitude will ensure Myhill makes the most of his talent. Katie FieldJoe Launchberry(Wasps)Joe Launchbury – London WaspsNaming a 30-man squad to take to the World Cup is no mean feat. Deciding how many players to take to cover each position is an exact science, and inevitably some players will feel unlucky to miss the cut. Versatility is a great asset when numbers are tight, and 20-year-old Joe Launchbury is showing he has that quality at Wasps this season.The sports science student made a handful of second-row appearances for the English club last season, and signed a three-year deal in May. But due to injuries to Joe Worsley and Tom Rees, his services this season have been required in the back row and he has become a regular on coach Dai Young’s team sheet. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. Launchbury was also part of the England U20 team that got to the final of the Junior World Championship in June, where he formed a terrific lock pairing with Quins’ Charlie Matthews. Such was Launchbury’s dogged durability that his team-mates voted him England’s Player of the Tournament.Rob Hoadley, Wasps assistant coach, says the club took a punt on the former Christ’s Hospital pupil that has paid off. “Joe didn’t come through our academy system, he was an unknown sent to us by (ex-Wasp) Will Green from Worthing,” he says. “Joe’s stood up to every challenge he’s been given. He’s got a great work-rate, good skills, and he carries hard, a real class operator. Joe also has massive ambitions.”Learning from the likes of Richard Birkett and Ross Filipo will help Launchbury to move up the ranks.Rugby World Verdict: With such talent and ambition Launchbury has 2015 on his radar. Bea AspreyThis article appeared in the December 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.center_img Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitlast_img read more

first_imgStopping TuilagiAnother intriguing subplot is the Tuilagi v Keith Earls, the human wrecking ball against the defensive paperweight. That, at least, is the popular perception, but Earls dealt well with France powerhouse Aurelien Rougerie in the wider channels last weekend. The Munsterman has been doing extra work on his defence lines, with people running at him from different angles, and he may cope with Tuilagi better than many expect.“He’s worked very hard and he’s in a good place,” says Ireland assistant coach Mark Tainton. “He’s very happy with himself at the moment and his defensive situation.”Sexton supremeIf Earls and chums can nullify Tuilagi, then England may have to resort to feeding off Irish errors because they’re still not constructing too much in attack. Despite their three tries in Paris, their trump card remains their defence, with its shades of ‘wolf-pack’ mentality as exemplified by Saracens.Ireland, with Johnny Sexton spraying his passes and cross-kicking for Bowe, have a far greater attacking threat. Sexton is also kicking his goals and he’s in pole position to wear the Lions No 10 shirt next year in Australia.Kearney, another of those to spice up this St Patrick’s Day fixture, was magnificent under the high ball against France and if and when Owen Farrell puts the ball up then expect Kearney to deal with it.Playing for LancasterEngland have a lousy record against Ireland in recent years and failure again would result in successive home defeats in the championship for the first time since 1983. Mathematically, they can still win the title but the flip side is that if France were to win in Cardiff, England could finish fourth – which would fulfil pre-tournament expectations.However, victory will ramp up the campaign to install interim coach Stuart Lancaster permanently in the hot seat. That is a powerful incentive for the England players, who appear to be backing him en bloc.VerdictRory Best will become Ireland’s most-capped hooker, with his 59th appearance. He should make it a double celebration by captaining his team to victory – by less than one score.ENGLAND v IRELAND, TWICKENHAM, SATURDAY 17 MARCH, KICK-OFF 5pmEngland: Ben Foden; Chris Ashton, Manu Tuilagi, Brad Barritt, David Strettle; Owen Farrell, Lee Dickson, Alex Corbisiero, Dylan Hartley, Dan Cole, Mouritz Botha, Geoff Parling, Tom Croft, Chris Robshaw (capt), Ben Morgan. Replacements: Lee Mears, Matt Stevens, Tom Palmer, Phil Dowson, Ben Youngs, Charlie Hodgson, Mike Brown. Dynamo: Manu Tuilagi is always a handful Ireland: Rob Kearney, Tommy Bowe, Keith Earls, Gordon D’Arcy, Andrew Trimble; Jonathan Sexton, Eoin Reddan; Cian Healy, Rory Best (capt), Mike Ross, Donncha O’Callaghan, Donnacha Ryan, Stephen Ferris, Sean O’Brien, Jamie Heaslip.
Replacements: Sean Cronin, Tom Court, Mike McCarthy, Peter O’Mahony, Tomas O’Leary, Ronan O’Gara, Fergus McFadden.Referee: Nigel Owens (Wales) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Plenty to say: Ireland flanker Stephen Ferris has stoked the fires ahead of the Twickenham clashBy Alan Pearey, Rugby World Deputy EditorIt’s helpful, when unsure which way a match will go, to conduct a man-for-man comparison and see what a composite XV would look like. Adopting this method, the only Englishman I would unhesitatingly include is Manu Tuilagi, which is ironic given the way the Irish have talked of exposing his defence.Rob Kearney, Tommy Bowe, Johnny Sexton, Cian Healy, Stephen Ferris and Jamie Heaslip are emphatically superior players to their opposite numbers, yet once again, in this unpredictable RBS 6 Nations, everything points to a nail-biting contest.Getting lippyIreland have been unusually gobby in advance of the match. Perhaps they’re thinking of their many recent successes in the fixture – just one defeat in the last eight championship meetings – but after dissing the English they’re putting extra pressure on themselves to deliver.Especially Stephen Ferris, who this week called England “bad losers” and trotted out the baloney about England teams across the age groups being arrogant. The Ulsterman might now attract even closer attention than usual from the English forwards, and they would be wise to do so, for when Ferris gets moving so do the Irish. He is a beast and a one-legged at that, because one of his knees has had all the cartilage removed!Ferris would probably have played in the 2009 Lions Test team but for injury, and his replacement in South Africa was Tom Croft – his rival on Saturday. It will be an interesting battle, even if they are polar opposites in terms of styles. Both could be match-winners, but Croft’s biggest influence is likely to be in the lineout, where he floats like a butterfly on England’s ball and stings like a bee on opposition ball, helped by the fact he’s so agile he can be lifted by just one player.last_img read more

first_imgMost of the good people of Clermont Auvergne are nuts about rugby. Every home game is a sellout and the cafes and bistros of this central French town hum each day with rugby talk. Nonetheless Byrne says living in Clermont has given him more freedom than he had when he played for the Ospreys. “It is a bit more relaxed here,” he says. “Wales is so small that at times it does feel like you’re in a goldfish bowl. But of course the other side of that is that in France my rugby doesn’t get the exposure that it would if I was in Wales.”Byrne will have all the exposure he needs in the Heineken Cup and perhaps a string of good displays will give him the chance to reach that half-century of caps. And who knows, maybe Byrne will be wearing another red jersey when the Lions tour Australia next summer. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NEW PLYMOUTH, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 26: Lee Byrne of Wales goes past his opposite number Chrysander Botha of Namibia during the IRB 2011 Rugby World Cup Pool D match between Wales and Namibia at Stadium Taranaki on September 26, 2011 in New Plymouth, New Zealand. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) Prime time: Byrne hopes his fine French form helps him notch 50 caps for his countryIT IS a year since Lee Byrne won the last of his 46 caps for Wales, but the 32-year-old full-back hasn’t given up hope of hitting his half century this season. Currently playing some of the best rugby of his career, Byrne has helped Clermont to pole position in the Top 14 and reminded the Welsh selectors that there’s still life left in the boy from Bridgend. “I certainly hope I’ll play for Wales again,” replies Byrne, whose last appearance was against Fiji in the 2011 World Cup. “I’d love to get to 50 caps but it’s whether the coaches see me and think I can do the job. I’ve been playing well so far this season and I hope I can carry that on into the Heineken Cup.”Clermont kick-off their European campaign by hosting the Scarlets on October 13th and a week later travel to England to take on Exeter Chiefs. Then in December it’s back to back matches against reigning champions Leinster. That’s a series of matches to test the mettle of anyone, and Byrne can’t wait for the Heineken Cup to begin. “We’ve started talking about the Heineken Cup in the last couple of weeks,” explains Byrne. “We’ve got to be one of the toughest groups, but if we can win our home games and then pinch a couple of games on the road…”Byrne reads nothing into Leinster’s stuttering start in the Rabo12. “They always come good in the Heineken Cup,” he says of the team that has won the title in three of the last four seasons. Exeter, too, he rates highly, and as for the Scarlets, currently second in the Rabo12, Byrne is relishing the prospect of welcoming them to the Stade Marcel Michelin. “Mark Jones and Simon Easterby have done a great job with the Scarlets and I’m looking forward to testing myself against them,” he says. “I’ve watched them this season and they have such a great backline. It’s a really exciting challenge.”Byrne at the 2011 RWCThat Scarlets backline boasts some of the sharpest young talent in Wales – George North, Jonathan Davies and Simon Williams to name just three – but Clermont aren’t short of the odd star. On the wings they have Sivivatu Sitiveni and Napolioni Nalaga, and in the centre this season Wesley Fofana has formed an impressive partnership with former All Black Benson Stanley. Like the rest of us, Byrne has been astonished by the emergence of the 24-year-old Fofana in the past 12 months. “He has unbelievable pace and power,” explains Byrne. “He seems to glide when he runs but then he breaks tackles. His defence is excellent and in my opinion he’s not far from being the complete player. He’s going to be a big star for France for a long time to come.” Byrne’s own game is in pretty good nick right now after a couple of seasons where he struggled with injuries. “I’m happy with the ways things are going,” he says. “Moving to France has brought a hard edge to my game and we have a great coach in Vern Cotter. He’s given me a lot of confidence in my ability.”last_img read more

first_imgMike Phillips – Playing France always seems to bring out the best in the scrum-half and he had an extra spark about him from the first whistle. Troubled France with his physicality and made a couple of good breaks – just needs to work on his speed getting the ball away from the breakdown.Face-off: Mike Phillips and Louis PicamolesColdGethin Jenkins – An improved performance from last weekend but his lack of game time at Toulon is showing. Wales were penalised heavily at the scrum and while Jenkins was a nuisance at ruck time, his ability to last 80 minutes is still being questioned.Dan Biggar – This is harsh on the fly-half, who put his body on the line in defence and set up the try, but there were too many kicking errors – straight out, too long – for him to put serious pressure on the other contenders for that Lions No 10 shirt.StatsFrance No 8 Louis Picamoles – or should that be Louis Pic-and-go – topped the ball carries with 16 and made the most metres with 79.Wales made four line breaks to France’s two but it was pretty even elsewhere – France made 291 metres to Wales’ 293 and 113 carries to 110, while possession was shared 50-50.Scorers LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS France – Pens: Michalak 2.Wales – Try: North. Con: Halfpenny. Pen: Halfpenny 3. NOT FOR FEATURED Over and out: Wales wing George North dives across the line to score the only try of the game in ParisBy Sarah Mockford at Stade de FranceIn a nutshellThis was a drab game, full of errors and lacking inspiration, with little to entertain as players trudged from scrum to scrum. In fact, it looked like the pitch – cutting up as if a bunch of soon-to-be Findus lasagnes had stormed across it – was going to be the main talking point until George North dived over the line. That try broke the deadlock after an insipid 72 minutes and from there Wales closed out a memorable win against a dire French side.France had their chances but continually chose the wrong option. They seemed bereft of ideas and almost looked afraid to back themselves in the second half. Les Bleus may have been tipped as Six Nations champs, but now they’re bottom of the table and have more chance of picking up the wooden spoon.Celebrate: Jonathan Davies and Jamie RobertsKey momentThere was only one standout moment in the whole 80 minutes and that was North’s try. Dan Biggar put a deft chip behind the French defence, North somehow collected the ball and dove over the line. It was a great finish from the winger in a tight space and the score proved to be the difference.Star manLeigh Halfpenny has been Wales’ most consistent performer for 12 months and he didn’t let his standards drop at the Stade de France. He may have had a kick charged down early on, but he was as safe as ever at the back, attacked the gain-line in the second half and nailed two crucial kicks – the touchline conversion of North’s try and a subsequent long-range penalty to take the game beyond France’s reach.Lions watch – HotRyan Jones – Back from injury and, if you’ll excuse the cliché, he really led from the front. Carried strongly, defended heartily, kept his team fired up and even put in an impressive kick to touch.Andrew Coombs – Okay, he may be a long way from the Lions reckoning but he is doing his utmost to push his case. After a solid debut last week, he impressed again here, particularly with his work in defence.last_img read more

first_img Australia Rugby Championship Squad Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. New Zealand Rugby Championship Squad South Africa Rugby Championship SquadSteven Kitshoff, Damian de Allende and Francois Louw return to the starting line-up for the Springboks match against the All Blacks this weekend. Willie le Roux is also set to collect his 50th cap for the side looking to repeat their shock victory in New Zealand in September.Rassie Erasmus said; “The All Blacks usually hit hard back after a loss so we have to be mentally and physically ready for a massive contest. We will have to front up in defence and be clinical when we creating chances because the All Blacks punish you for errors and missed opportunities. The Springboks versus All Blacks at a packed Loftus, I think it’s going to be a special occasion.”South Africa team to face New Zealand in the Rugby Championship – Saturday 6th Octoberle Roux, Kolbe, Kriel, de Allende, Dyantyi; Pollard, de Klerk, Louw, du Toit, Kolisi, (captain), Mostert, Etzebeth, Malherbe, Marx, Mtawarira.Replacements: Mbonambi, Mtawarira, Koch, Snyman, Notshe, Papier, Jantjies, Willemse.South Africa team to face Australia in the Rugby Championship – Saturday 29th Septemberle Roux, Kolbe, Kriel, Esterhuizen, Dyantyi, Pollard, de Klerk, Notshe, du Toit, Kolisi (captain), Mostert, Etzebeth, Malherbe, Marx, MtawariraReplacements: Mbonambi, Kitshoff, Louw, Snyman, van Staden, Papier, Jantjies, WillemseSouth Africa team to face New Zealand in the Rugby Championship – Saturday 15th Septemberle Roux; Kriel, Am, de Allende, Dyantyi; Pollard, de Klerk, Whiteley, du Toit, Kolisi (captain), Mostert, Etzebeth, Malherbe, Marx, KitshoffReplacements: Mbonambi, Mtawarira, Louw, Snyman, Louw, Cronje, Jantjies, KolbeSouth Africa team to face Australia in the Rugby Championship – Saturday 8th Septemberle Roux, Mapimpi, Kriel, de Allende, Dyantyi, Jantjies, de Klerk, Whiteley, du Toit, Kolisi (captain), Mostert, Etzebeth, Malherbe, Mbonambi, KitshoffReplacements: Marx, Mtawarira, Louw, Snyman, Louw, Papier, Pollard, Kolbe.South Africa team to face Argentina in the Rugby Championship – Saturday 25th Augustle Roux, Mapimpi, Am, Esterhuizen, Dyantyi, Pollard, de Klerk, Whiteley, Kolisi (captain), Louw, Mostert, Etzebeth, Malherbe, Marx, MtawariraReplacements: Mbonambi, Kitshoff, Louw, Snyman, du Toit, Papier, Mapoe, Willemse Expand Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Argentina Rugby Championship Squad See the Pumas squad new coach Mario Ledesma… Collapsecenter_img Argentina Rugby Championship Squad Australia Rugby Championship Squad Michael Cheika has named his Australia squad for… New Zealand Rugby Championship Squad Take a look at the full squad the Springboks will use for the upcoming Rugby Championship here Take a look at the squad Steve Hansen… South Africa team to face Argentina in the Rugby Championship – Saturday 18th Augustle Roux, Mapimpi, Am, Esterhuizen, Dyantyi, Pollard, de Klerk, Whiteley, Kolisi (captain), Louw, du Toit, Etzebeth, Malherbe, Marx, MtawariraReplacements: Mbonambi, Kitshoff, du Toit, Orie, van Staden, Papier, Mapoe, WillemseSpringbok coach Rassie Erasmus has named his 35-man squad for the upcoming 2018 Rugby Championship. A plethora of Test regulars return to the South Africa side after having not featured in their 2-1 series win over England in the summer.The Lions quartet of Malcolm Marx, Warren Whiteley, Ross Cronje and Lionel Mapoe all come back into the squad for the first time this year. Bath forward Francois Louw, Lwazi Mvovo and the man mountain Eben Etzebeth also return to the squad.Erasmus said: “Eben and Warren have been out of the Bok mix for a while because of injury so it’s very pleasing to have them back in the squad, while Malcolm has regained his good form with the Lions since recovering from his injury.”In relation to Etzebeth, he said: “He has trained with us since the Stormers had their bye before their last (Super Rugby) match,” Erasmus said.“He has done every single physical thing. He is functionally up there and definitely one of the fittest guys in the squad, that I can promise you, just by looking at his stats and the way he has trained.”Bad Luck: Eztebeth has had a terrible run of injuries, but returns to the squad (Getty Images)There are also several young players selected in the squad, including Damian Willemse, Marco Van Staden and Cyle Brink.“It is also pleasing to again add some young players who been showing good form and consistency for their franchise teams during Super Rugby,” Erasmus added.2018 Rugby Championship SquadForwards: Cyle Brink, Jean-Luc du Preez, Thomas du Toit, Pieter-Steph du Toit, Eben Etzebeth, Steven Kitshoff, Siya Kolisi (captain), Francois Louw, Wilco Louw, Frans Malherbe, Malcolm Marx, Bongi Mbonambi, Franco Mostert, Tendai Mtawarira, Sikhumbuzo Notshe, Marvin Orie, RG Snyman, Akker van der Merwe, Marco van Staden, Warren Whiteley Backs: Lukhanyo Am, Ross Cronjé, Faf de Klerk, Aphiwe Dyantyi, André Esterhuizen, Elton Jantjies, Jesse Kriel, Willie le Roux, Makazole Mapimpi, Lionel Mapoe, Lwazi Mvovo, Embrose Papier, Handré Pollard, Ivan van Zyl, Damian Willemselast_img read more

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] El Libro Azul, la colección de informes a la 77ª. Convención General de la Iglesia Episcopal sobre la labor llevada a cabo por sus comités, comisiones, agencias y juntas (CCAB por su sigla en inglés) durante el trienio 2010-2012 ya se encuentra disponible y se puede descargar aquí.El libro, de más de 750 páginas, también contiene más de 150 resoluciones “A” que los CCAB han propuesto a la Convención General, la cual sesionará del 5 al 12 de julio en el Centro de Convenciones de Indiana, en Indianápolis, Indiana, en la diócesis de Indianápolis. (Las audiencias del Comité Legislativo y algunas otras actividades de la Convención comienzan el 4 de julio).La mayoría, pero no todas, las resoluciones “A” están contenidas en el Libro Azul. Por ejemplo, el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia convino el 20 de abril en presentar tres resoluciones “A” a la Convención. Esas tres resoluciones pueden encontrarse en una lista de todas las decisiones del Consejo aquí.Otros tres grupos también pueden presentar resoluciones a la Convención: los obispos (resoluciones “B”); las diócesis (resoluciones “C”) y los diputados (resoluciones “D”). La obispa primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, y la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Bonnie Anderson, asignan cada resolución, en el orden en que se reciben, a uno de los comités legislativos de la Convención. Una vez que se asignan, las resoluciones aparecen aquí. La fecha límite para presentar cualquier tipo de resolución es a las 5:00 P.M. (hora de verano del Este) del 6 de julio, el segundo día oficial de la Convención.El archivo electrónico de 5.15 MB del Libro Azul en formato de PDF incluye un índice de contenido con enlaces a cada informe de los CCAB. Y esta edición del Libro Azul es color salmón (Pantone 169M).Las personas que deseen comprar un ejemplar impreso del Libro Azul pueden hacer su pedido a Church Publishing Inc. aquí por $35. Cokesbury, distribuidor de materiales de Church Publishing ofrece actualmente un descuento de un 20 por ciento, lo cual reduce el precio a $28. Los compradores deben pagar los costos de envío basados en el lugar donde vivan.Por primera vez, el Libro Azul se podrá encontrar en formatos electrónicos e-book, también de Church Publishing. Ambas versiones estarán disponibles la semana del 30 de abril, según un comunicado de prensa de la Oficina de Relaciones Públicas de la Iglesia.Un PDF del Libro Azul en español, también estará disponible en la semana del 30 de abril.Para preguntas relacionadas con el Libro Azul, diríjase a Christopher Barajas en la Oficina de la Convención General en [email protected] Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Apr 24, 2012 Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Informes del ‘Libro Azul’ publicados en la página web de la Convención General Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Vista aérea del campamento de refugiados en Yida. Foto de Robin Denney.[Episcopal News Service] Yida, el mayor campamento de refugiados de Sudán del Sur, se extiende por kilómetros. Es el hogar de más de 64.000 de los 206.000 refugiados de la República del Sudán que han huido de los bombardeos y las agresiones contra civiles llevadas a cabo por el gobierno de Jartum desde junio de 2011. El campamento de Yida mismo fue bombardeado el 10 de noviembre de 2011 con un saldo de 12 refugiados muertos.A sólo 20 kilómetros de la volátil frontera entre Sudán y Sudán del Sur, el campamento de Yida presencia un flujo constante de casi 200 refugiados por día, que vienen de la región de las montañas de Nuba (estado de Kordofán del Sur) en el Sudán. Grupos rebeldes en los estados de Darfur, Kordofán del Sur y Nilo Azul se han unido contra el gobierno de Jartum, las Fuerzas Armadas Sudanesas (SAF, por su sigla en inglés), que atacan indiscriminadamente a rebeldes y civiles en esas zonas.“Matan a todo el mundo, cristianos y musulmanes. Queman casas, iglesias y escuelas. Matan a la gente. Lanzan bombas. Hace sólo dos días los soldados llegaron a mi zona [en las montañas de Nuba] y mataron a una persona y quemaron algunas casas”, dijo el Rdo. Ameka Yousif, un pastor que ha vivido en el campamento de Yida desde febrero. “[En las montañas de Nuba] cuando la gente ve los aviones corre a esconderse. Los bombardeos ocurren casi todos los días”.Algunos niños se reúnen en una iglesia de la Iglesia Episcopal de Sudán en el campamento de refugiados en Yida. Foto de Robin Denney.El campamento de Yida sigue creciendo, en tanto los ataques de parte de las SAF en las montañas de Nuba  han aumentado en intensidad durante el último mes. La ONU espera que la población del campamento ascienda a 90.000 personas para fines de año.En enero de 2011, se celebró un referendo en el que los ciudadanos del sur del Sudán decidieron por abrumadora mayoría separarse del norte y convertirse en una nación independiente. Seis meses después, el 9 de julio de 2011, nació la República de Sudán del Sur. El referendo quedó especificado en un Acuerdo de Paz Global (CPA, por su sigla en inglés) —firmado en 2005 entre el gobierno del Sudán, en el norte, que tiene su sede en Jartum, y el Movimiento Popular de Liberación del Sudán en el sur— que le puso fin a una guerra civil que duró décadas, que le costó la vida a más de 2 millones de personas y se calcula que desplazó a otros 7 millones.Aunque las condiciones en el terreno han mejorado en gran parte del Sudán del Sur desde el referendo, el conflicto a lo largo de la frontera, especialmente en las zonas en disputa, se ha intensificado.Provenientes de algunas aldeas en las montañas de Nuba, comunidades enteras se han mudado a Yida, explicaba Yousif. “Pero algunas personas rehúsan irse. Dicen ‘éste es mi lugar, moriré aquí’”.Cuatro mil miembros de la Diócesis de Kadugli de la Iglesia Episcopal del Sudán residen ahora en el campamento de Yida. Tienen cuatro iglesias organizadas en diferentes partes del campamento, y siete sacerdotes. Las iglesias de la IES están compuestas de muchas tribus que adoran juntas. Se apoyan unos a otros en oración y ayuda a los más vulnerables entre ellos, especialmente las viudas y los huérfanos.“La Iglesia está creciendo, he bautizado a cuarenta nuevos creyentes este mes”, dijo el Rdo. Ali Haroun, pastor principal de la IES en Yida. Cuando le preguntan por qué la gente asiste a la iglesia en este lugar desesperado, Haroun respondió: “ven como nos cuidamos mutuamente”.La clínica sanitaria gratuita dirigida por la Iglesia Episcopal del Sudán en el campamento de refugiados de Yida. Foto de Robin Denney.Las condiciones en el campamento son precarias. En julio, la tasa de mortalidad diaria fue de tres muertes por cada 10.000 niños menores de cinco años, y una muerte por cada 10.000 adultos. En agosto, la tasa se redujo a una muerte por cada 10.000 niños por día, lo cual, según datos de la ONU, es el umbral de la situación de emergencia.“La ración de alimento,  cuatro latas de sorgo por persona al mes, no es suficiente”, dijo Yousif. “La gente cambia parte de su sorgo por sal y jabón, y luego la ración se le acaba antes del mes. Moler también resulta caro, por consiguiente muchas personas sencillamente mastican los granos”.Hay varios puestos médicos en Yida donde las personas pueden ser atendidas, pero las colas son largas.“A veces las personas pueden estar esperando el día entero y les dicen que regresen el día siguiente. El día siguiente puede ser demasiado tarde para ellos”, dijo Kukuri Mathias, enfermera y miembro de la IES.En Yida hay siete enfermeras titulares y seis auxiliares que son miembros de la IES. En respuesta a la urgente necesidad de atención médica, administran una clínica gratuita. Levantaron una sencilla estructura de paja con dos camas donde pueden ingresar a pacientes. Con donaciones de los refugiados, enviaron a alguien que recorrió tres días a pie a través de un territorio inundado para llegar a Pariang, el pueblo más cercano a Yida, para comprar medicinas. Estas medicinas ahora se han terminado.La Agencia Sudanesa de Desarrollo y Socorro (SUDRA, por su sigla en inglés), con la cooperación de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales y de Esperanza Internacional, busca obtener más apoyo para los refugiados de Yida. Al presente, algunos medicamentos de SUDRA están en camino a Yida. Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales no tardará en enviar asistencia adicional en apoyo al trabajo que la SUDRA realiza allí. Pero se necesita más.Puesto que Yida se clasifica como un campamento provisional, la agencia de las Naciones Unidas para los refugiados (UNHCR, por su sigla en inglés) no ofrece ayuda para la agricultura o la educación. Desesperados por obtener más comida, los refugiados en Yida han plantado alrededor de sus casas semillas que trajeron consigo desde las montañas de Nuba, pero las herramientas disponibles son escasas y se encuentran dispersas. Ansiosos de educarse, los refugiados han organizados escuelas comunitarias, con maestros voluntarios. La mayoría de los maestros carece de la preparación adecuada, y los materiales son tan pocos que más de cien personas se enraciman en torno a un pequeño pizarrón. Estas escuelas improvisadas sirven tan sólo a una pequeña fracción de los que desean educarse.Una escuela organizada por la comunidad ofrece instrucción en el campamento de refugiados de Yida. Foto de Robin Denney.“Mi primera prioridad es la educación, y la segunda es la agricultura” reportó el obispo Andudu Adam Elnail, obispo de la diócesis de Kadugli, que incluye las montañas de Nuba, luego de su reciente visita al campamento de Yida. La mayoría de las personas de la diócesis de Kadugli se encuentran desplazadas, ya sea en el campamento o en las montañas”.Las fuerzas del gobierno quemaron los edificios de la catedral y de las oficinas diocesanas de la diócesis de Kadugli hace más de un año. También querían matar al obispo, pero él se encontraba en Estados Unidos en ese momento donde había ido a recibir tratamiento médico. Mientras se encontraba en EE.UU., testificó ante el Subcomité sobre África de la Cámara de Representantes, ocasión en la que dijo: “si no hubiera estado aquí hoy para testificar ante ustedes, no sé si estaría ahora en una fosa común en Kadugli”.La guerra civil en Sudán se extendió más allá de las montañas de Nuba, para incluir también los estados de Darfur y de Nilo Azul. Aproximadamente 655.000 sudaneses se han visto desplazados de los estados de Nilo Azul y Kordofán del Sur.Mukesh Kapila , ex coordinador  de la ONU para el Sudán, dijo que el conflicto actual en Kordofán del Sur es aun peor que el famoso genocidio de Darfur que comenzó en 2003. Pruebas videográficas encontradas por los rebeldes y divulgadas por Al Jazeera muestran a soldados del gobierno recibiendo instrucciones de que no dejaran vivo a nadie. El Proyecto Basta también ha reunido pruebas de fosas comunes. Debido a que la ONU y las organizaciones humanitarias han sido excluidas de la zona por el gobierno de Jartum, no hay cifras sólidas respecto a las miles de personas que han muerto. Pero resulta clara que se requiere una acción urgente de parte de la comunidad internacional para frenar la violencia y garantizar la ayuda humanitaria.– Robin Denney de la Diócesis de El Camino Real fue misionera episcopal en el Sudán de 2009 a 2011 y sirvió como asesora de agricultura a la Iglesia Episcopal del Sudán. Regresó recientemente a Sudán del Sur para visitar algunos proyectos agrícolas de la Iglesia y el campamento de refugiados de Yida.Pasos a seguir que se sugieren:Orar por la Diócesis de Kadugli, por el obispo Andudu y por todos los desplazados por el conflicto en el Sudán.Hacer donaciones a Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales para apoyar la campaña de socorro en el campamento de Yida, y otros campos de refugiados en Sudán del Sur.Mantenerse informados mediante los noticieros en Internet, o suscribiéndose a los comunicados masivos semanales por internet de Amigos Americanos de la Iglesia Episcopal del Sudán (AFRECS, por su sigla en inglés) [email protected] Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Por Robin DenneyPosted Oct 12, 2012 Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Hacia Sudán del Sur para escapar del genocidiolast_img read more

first_imgAndrew M. L. Dietsche installed as 16th bishop of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal Diocese of New York] At a Feb. 2 service at Manhattan’s Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the Rt. Rev. Andrew Marion Lenow Dietsche was “recognized, invested and installed” as the 16th bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York.During the service a packed cathedral witnessed the passing to Dietsche of the symbols of office — the stole, cope, miter and crozier of the bishop of New York— by retiring Bishop Mark S. Sisk.Following the peace, a letter from the bishop of London was read out by his commissary, the Rev. Alan McCormack, and Congressman Charles B. Rangel also addressed the congregation.Dietsche, who takes over from Sisk, was chosen as the next leader of New York’s Episcopalians by the clergy and laity of the Diocese of New York in an election held in November 2011. In March 2012, he was consecrated bishop coadjutor, also at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Since then and until Feb. 2, he has served alongside Sisk.From 2001 until his election as bishop coadjutor, Dietsche served as canon for pastoral care in the Diocese of New York — a position in which he was responsible for the pastoral care of the clergy and their families. During that time, and until now, he has been resident in Poughkeepsie (as bishop, he will reside in a house in the Cathedral Close). Before that he was for 11 years the rector of the Church of the Good Shepherd in West Springfield, Massachusetts.Prior to his ordination, Dietsche was a freelance graphic designer and cartoonist – and he continues to produce award-winning cartoons for the diocesan publication, Episcopal New Yorker. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release February 4, 2013 at 8:26 pm Mozel tov and God bless! Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET People Rector Collierville, TN Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (1) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Bishop Consecrations, Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest John McGrath says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Richard NicholsonPosted Feb 4, 2013 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC House of Bishops, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN May 28, 2015 at 2:27 pm We applaud the Anglicans for supporting the First Nations who want to protect their sacred land. We take issue with Mary Polack’s claim that biosolids are similar to manure. They are not. Unlike manure, they contain not only dangerous pathogens, but thousands of unregulated industrial chemicals, many of which are extremely toxic, persistent, adhere to and are absorbed by plants, and can magnify in the food chain. Nor do repeated sludge applications improve soils; just the opposite: they degrade soils, as persistent chemicals accumulate in the soil and reduce yields.The current outdated regulations do not protect health and the environment.The smell from biosolids is not just a nuisance; it means the material is putrefying and emitting bacteria- containing bioaerosols and endotoxins. Serious life-threatening respiratory symptoms suffered by many sludge-exposed neighbors subjected to this stench have been documented in the scientific literature.The benefits are reaped by large cities who need to get rid of their daily tons of sludge and by companies that profit from this practice. The risks, on the other hand, which far outweigh any benefits–are being absorbed not just by exposed rural neighbors, but by plants, animals, soil ,and water. In fact by entire terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Poisoning the land and water with human and industrial biosolids- waste cannot be defended on scientific or moral grounds. For documentation, see http://www.sludgefacts.org Rector Pittsburgh, PA Gary Chandler says: Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (2) Rector Shreveport, LA Heather Shuter, Clarence Basil and Denise Lafferty mind the blockade outside of Shulus. Photo: André Forget[Anglican Journal] A bad smell hangs over parts of British Columbia’s Nicola Valley.Partially processed human waste — known in the industry as “biosolids” — are being dumped onto a 320-acre patch of former ranch land not far from where the Spius Creek flows into the Nicola River, and concerns about the safety of the practice have led local First Nations to impose a moratorium on the practice and local concerned citizens to enforce a blockade to keep more waste from entering the valley.“It’s like living in a real stinky outhouse,” said Heather Shuter, a member of the community action group Friends of the Nicola Valley and member of Scw’exmx parish, part of the Anglican Parishes of the Central Interior (APCI). “My daughter drove up the hill, and she must have [driven] through one of these fields, and when they came back she said they had a devil of a time cleaning their pickup because it stunk so much.”Harold Joe, a councilor for the Lower Nicola Indian Band, said people became aware of the dumping only last winter. “Some of the residents close by there were objecting to the smell,” he said. “It all happened kind of suddenly.”Lower Nicola’s chief, Aaron Sam, wasn’t given any warning about the dumping, either. “[Due to] community concern, the local bands and the chiefs started looking into the issue,” he said. “We haven’t been notified by the government at all where it’s being disposed of in our territory. The way we found out about it back then is by word of mouth.”In early March, the Friends of the Nicola Valley responded by blockading Highway 8, the main highway leading into the valley, in order to keep any more biosolids from being dumped on the land near their homes.“People from all over B.C. have stopped here,” said Judy Weinart, who has been on the blockade almost every day since it began. “They’re sympathetic. [The biosolids] come out of their area, and they can’t believe it’s being dumped here.”Weinart and fellow-blockader Jason Schroeder encourage drivers of passing cars to sign a petition. They seem to have a good rapport with them, many of whom honk in support. When traffic is slow, the blockaders tend a fire to keep themselves warm. Beside the highway, they have placed large homemade signs with slogans like, “No More Bio Sludge!” and “Keep Your Own Sewage!”From the very beginning of the protest, many of the strongest voices have been Anglican. The priest for Scw’exmx Parish, the Rev. Danny Whitehead, has been unwavering in his support of the actions, offering the parish hall in Shulus to blockaders who need somewhere to rest.“As Christians, we are called to take care of creation,” Whitehead explained. “Our First Nations brothers and sisters have always done that, and set an example for us—and so being a priest [who] has the privilege and honour of working with First Nations, I very much support what they’re doing.”The blockade has also received enthusiastic support from Barbara Andrews, suffragan bishop in charge of APCI, who has invited all members of APCI “to come with me to be protectors on the picket line.”Members of the territory’s Indigenous council, including many pastoral elders, came forward at APCI’s assembly at the beginning of May to encourage Anglicans of the Central Interior to stand with their First Nations brothers and sisters in protecting the land.In a passionate address to the assembly, Shuter spoke about the challenges facing both settlers and First Nations people in the Nicola Valley.“They’re slathering it on our fields, our ranch lands, in the wilderness,” she said, “and they put a sign up there saying, ‘don’t go on this property for three months, do not eat any of the products from this field for three years.’ Do our deer know how to read that sign? Do our fish know how to read that sign, when they’re swimming in those rivers?”This point, in particular, strikes a strong chord with many First Nations people living in the valley, who subsist in large part from food gathered in the traditional manner. Shuter herself estimates that 90 per cent of the meat and fish her family eats comes from the land rather than the supermarket.Sam, too, is worried about the potential effects contamination of the water could have on public health, given that the land the biosolids are being dumped on is not far from the Nicola River, the valley’s main water source and an important salmon spawning ground“When it affects the land, it affects the water,” he said. “We’re concerned about the health of the community…People from our communities are still very, very reliant on fish and salmon, and we’re very reliant on our traditional foods.”But while many of the First Nations and settlers living in the valley are united in their resistance to dumping, finding a solution to the problem has not been easy.The chiefs of the Nicola Valley bands sent a letter to the provincial government in December informing them, as Sam put it, “that we wanted the biosolids not to be coming into the valley anymore, and we wanted to be informed about what is going on in our traditional territory.”The problem is that the biosolids are being disposed of on private land that has been purchased for this purpose. Several companies are involved, including Agassiz-based BioCentral and New Westminster-based Sylvis, and all of them obtained the necessary government permits.The chiefs have had some contact with the companies bringing the waste into their community, and some of the companies have shown a desire to work out an arrangement, but Sam said this will not lead to a lasting solution.“It’s an issue with government,” he said. “The government has that legal obligation to consult and accommodate First Nations, and all these companies…it’s not the companies’ fault—they worked through the current legislation. The First Nations perspective is that we have to figure something out on how we’re going to move forward with government.”The provincial government, however, has not responded to concerns raised by Nicola Valley residents.In March, the Friends of the Nicola Valley chose to enforce the moratorium declared by the chiefs by blockading the highway around the clock, and while this effectively stopped the dumping, it still did not bring serious government engagement. In mid-April, the five Nicola Valley chiefs took things a step further by blockading Christy Clark’s constituency office in West Kelowna, an action that Shuter was personally involved in.“Three non-Natives had to get us in the building,” she recalled. “We called them Trojan grannies — three elderly ladies. Their job was to get the door open, and then all the protectors [sic], who were around the side of the building…had to zip in, and that’s the only way we got in, because they had already been notified that some blockaders were going to be over there. We were there for six days. Nothing from Christy Clark.”In an April 15 press conference, Clark said there is no easy solution. “There’s a lot of hands in the pot here, so it’s taking a little bit more time than I would have hoped to get it settled.”Clark noted that the Minister of the Environment, Mary Polak, had met with the protesters, but when asked about it, Sam said the meeting “didn’t go anywhere.”“They weren’t willing to move anything at all,” Shuter explained, “so the meeting dissolved.”When asked to comment on the matter by the Anglican Journal, Polak sent a copy of a statement she issued, which expressed her support of the “application” of biosolids. “Biosolids can only be applied to the land when there is benefit,” said the statement. “Biosolids are used in compost or as fertilizer on land. The nutrients in the biosolids make soils healthier, similar to animal manure.” Polak on to note that she had met on “numerous” occasions with “local residents and community leaders, including First Nations.”The statement ended with Polak underlining her commitment to “work closely with all parties to ensure concerns are heard and addressed—and to ensure the application of biosolids is always done safely for people and the environment.”While Jackie Tegart, MLA for Fraser-Nicola acknowledged that various groups have expressed concerns, and assured her constituents that the government was taking them seriously, she, too, was quick to defend the practice.“Biosolids have been applied at a number of locations in the Nicola Valley—and around the province—since 2002 in accordance with the Organic Matter Recycling Regulation, a safeguard that is designed to protect people and the environment.”Neither Polak nor Tegart, however, addressed the problem of the smell, and nor did they speak to Shuter’s and Sam’s concerns over the government’s failure to inform and seek consent from First Nations beforehand.But the Friends of the Nicola Valley and the First Nations bands both hope that the government can be brought to the table for an honest discussion.“In regards to a moratorium and whether the government is going to agree with that, well, we’ve invited them to support our moratorium, so we’ll see where that goes,” said Sam. “The one thing that’s really important from our perspective is that we the Nicola chiefs realize that this is an issue that isn’t going to go away.”— André Forget joined the Anglican Journal in 2014 as staff writer and social media lead. He also serves as managing editor of Whether Magazine, and his writing has appeared in The Dalhousie Review, The Winnipeg Review, and the Town Crier. Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Anglican Communion Comments are closed. Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Caroline Snyder says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By André ForgetPosted May 28, 2015 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canada: Anglicans join biosolids protest in Nicola Valley Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing May 28, 2015 at 9:55 pm There are many reasons to oppose toxic waste dumps in our watersheds. This is nothing but an attempt to avoid the costs of proper disposal and containment. Stop spreading pathogens and lies. http://alzheimerdisease.tv/alzheimers-disease-spreading-faster-via-biosolids-reclaimed-water/ Just look a little to the south and see the ravages that neurological disease is wreaking on Washington State. It’s quite possibly the Alzheimer’s disease capital of the world. Washington state also dumps sewage recklessly. Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

first_imgChurch of Wales rejects complaints over Bishop of Llandaff selection Anglican Communion Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Posted Apr 3, 2017 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church in Wales has rejected claims of “deeply inappropriate” conduct during the selection process for a new bishop of Llandaff.A gay clergyman, Dean of St Albans Jeffrey John, accused the church of homophobia after he was rejected for the role. He is understood to have received over half the votes, but not the two thirds required.Full article. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more