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first_imgA staple on the New Orleans funk-jam live music scene, Organized Crime has been holding down support slots at the city’s top-tier venues: Tipitina’s, Howlin’ Wolf, House of Blues, and the Maple Leaf Bar.Forming the group initially as Hammond organ-based trio, members Andriu Yanovski, Patrick Kelleher and Henry Green immersed themselves in a musical lineage, aligned with active groups like Soulive and Medeski Martin & Wood, but with literacy all the way back to Blue Note funk jazz revolutionaries Jimmy Smith and Dr. Lonnie Smith.In keeping with the ethos of their city, they study the musical traditions of their elders with a deep respect for what came before. However, with their sound fine-tuned in the workshop of the New Orleans live-music world (members can be found as a band and also individually with NOLA regulars Brass-a-Holics, Magnetic Ear, Eric “Benny” Bloom, Sexual Thunder!, A.J. Hall and more) Organized Crime transcends their jazz, funk, gospel and R&B roots with a springboard to the future: their debut studio release, “Do You/?”Listen to the new track, below.<a href=”http://organizedcrimefunk.bandcamp.com/track/do-you”>Do You/? by Organized Crime</a>The track features soaring rock guitar tones with organ accompaniment, and virtuosic synth solos that make it easy to forget that this wall of sound is the product of a trio. Grammy Award-winning producer Chris Finney, who himself is steeped in the NOLA traditions (Allen Toussaint, Dr. John, Rebirth Brass Band, Kermit Ruffins, Dumpstaphunk) brings the sound to life. Informed by the inimitable musical past of the city but unafraid to dig in to the contemporary, Finney offers the same expertise of experience to OC that he has leveraged in cultivating The Revivalists, Sexual Thunder!, and Naughty Professor.Celebrating this release, OC joined Naughty Professor for a collaborative party at the Maple Leaf Bar, Saturday December 10. With a full-length release on the horizon, we can expect Organized Crime to transform their business from a scrappy sonic enterprise to no less than a full-blown musical cartel.last_img read more

first_imgMolly Antopol’s debut, “The UnAmericans,” took almost 10 years to write, but was worth the wait. Published in 2014, the collection of stories about men and women struggling to navigate their place in the world and in complex relationships won the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award and made the National Book Award long list.   Antopol, the Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, has devoted her time as a Radcliffe Fellow to work on a novel that explores surveillance and privacy in politics and history. She answered questions from The Gazette for the second installment in “Decisions and Revisions,” a series of interviews with Harvard-affiliated writers on how their stories take shape. Read the first installment, with lecturer and novelist Claire Messud, here.GAZETTE: Where does your love of language come from?ANTOPOL: Even as a little kid I loved to read and write, but I never considered actually being a writer. I didn’t know any writers growing up — it seemed to me a completely pie-in-the-sky profession, like being an astronaut or a magician. When I was young, I would often just disappear somewhere in the apartment and my mother would find me writing myself into whatever book I was reading. As I got older and began to take writing more seriously, I started trying to figure out a way to make more room for it in my life. Once I realized how much I loved teaching and how beautifully that balanced with writing, I started trying to carve out a way to do both.‘I often feel that writing forces me to be a better version of myself, which is to say that I can’t be dismissive of people, I can’t be quick to judge.’GAZETTE: Are there certain writers who had a big impact on you?ANTOPOL: Grace Paley and James Baldwin have been hugely important to me from the beginning. They not only inspired me to write, they got me to think about why I write. When I was an undergraduate and in workshops for the first time, I had such a deep fear of seeming sentimental or overly emotional. So I was writing these really cool, tightly controlled stories even though they went completely against what came naturally to me and even went against what I wanted to read. Then I read Paley and Baldwin and I thought, “Wait, they’re not worried about that. They’re writing about the things that matter the most to them — the things they have to write.” That was a huge breakthrough for me — they’ll sit on my shoulders forever. Some other writers I turn to again and again are Natalia Ginzburg, Deborah Eisenberg, Joy Williams, Edith Pearlman, Edward P. Jones, Sergei Dovlatov, Louise Glück … I could go on and on.GAZETTE: What matters to you most when you are writing?ANTOPOL: Compassion. I often feel that writing forces me to be a better version of myself, which is to say that I can’t be dismissive of people, I can’t be quick to judge. In order to write the kind of fiction I’m really trying to write, I have to feel compassion for even the least sympathetic people, and spend time trying to understand their psychological makeup. If there’s one thing that links all of the writers I admire that I just mentioned, it’s that they have enormous empathy for every one of their characters.GAZETTE: Can you talk to me about your process? I know “The UnAmericans” took 10 years to write. Can you walk me through that?ANTOPOL: I had this piece of advice in my head early on. I’m not sure where I heard it — I have a sneaking feeling that I made it up. It was the idea that I should throw my entire self into a book and when I was finished, trash that book and start fresh. And that was basically what I did. I worked really hard on a collection of linked stories when I was in graduate school. I put everything that I could into it with the idea that no one would ever see it. My goal was that writing it would teach me many of the technical skills I hoped to have before I began writing the second book, the one I’d try to put out into the world. I ended up keeping two of my early stories — but, basically, that’s the reason “The UnAmericans” took so long.I’m also just a slow writer. I’m not a person who’s going to write 25 books in my life, and to be honest, I don’t really want to be. I love taking my time. I love the entire process of it, even though it can be humbling and lonely and difficult. The only way I know how to write a story is to think about my characters’ lives from the beginning to the end, and then, through subsequent drafts, to start to figure out what the most fraught or interesting moment is in their lives and begin to structure the piece once I understand that. And all the stories in “The UnAmericans” required a massive amount of research. With all of them, I read everything I could find about the story’s time and place, and applied for grants so that I could travel and interview people and spend time in archives. Every early draft of those stories was initially 70 or 80 pages long. With the early drafts, I’m still including bits and pieces of my characters’ lives that aren’t essential to the story, and am also still struck by so much research rapture that I include every detail, even the things that no one else would find mildly interesting.And then, many months and sometimes even a year after working on a story, I’ll begin to see its shape very clearly and I’ll start shucking away all of the details about my characters that no longer feel essential, along with most of the research I’ve done. With all of my stories, I’d say about 5 percent of the research remains by the end. But I can’t imagine not doing it — understanding the politics and history that influence my characters feels essential, and I also just don’t see the point of writing about a time and place that I haven’t tried my hardest to understand.GAZETTE: You have been a lecturer at Stanford for the past 10 years. How does teaching help inform your writing?ANTOPOL: I love teaching. I’d do it even if by some miracle I could afford to write full time. I really value the relationship I have with my students — it’s an incredible thing to get to work with a group of smart and engaged people who value fiction, who value sentences, in such a deep way. That isn’t something I always feel when I’m out in the world. I’ve had this experience a few times now, where I’ll assign a story that I’ve read 30 times and think I have a completely clear way to teach it, and then I walk into the classroom and they have an entirely new take on it that cracks the whole thing open for me. And, on another level, having a stable income and health insurance goes a long way toward giving me the freedom to write whatever I want. It feels essential to me to try to keep financial anxieties as far away from my work as they can be — I would never want any market to influence the kind of fiction I write.GAZETTE: Do you have a favorite place that you like to write? A time of day?ANTOPOL: I write whenever I can. I use Freedom software that allows me to block the internet — it’s amazing. I’m so addicted to the internet, and my brain is so trained every three minutes to check the newspaper, to check my email — it’s an incredible thing to only have access on my computer to my book for hours. I keep a notepad next to my desk and write down everything I want to research. At the end of my writing session that’s my treat to myself: I go back online and look all of it up. I have to do it that way. In the past I used to go down these research rabbit holes where I’d look up one seemingly simple detail and five hours later find myself in some intense bidding war on eBay.Otherwise, I don’t really have a routine, other than just treating it like a job, rather than waiting for inspiration to strike. I love how portable writing is. I can take my laptop and be anywhere. When my writing’s going well, I can work on the train, on a plane — it doesn’t matter.Part of the challenge for Antopol is making a story feel as immediate as real life.GAZETTE: What does it mean to you when your writing is going well? Can you describe that feeling?ANTOPOL: When it feels as present and immediate as the things that are actually happening in my life.GAZETTE: Tell me about the difference between writing a short story and writing a novel. Is one more challenging than the other?ANTOPOL: They’re both incredibly hard. Every time I start a new story, it feels as if I’m learning how to do it all over again. It’s such a humbling process. I don’t think I’ve ever written a story in less than eight or 10 or 12 drafts. It just never happens. In a way, writing this [current] draft of the novel feels really freeing because everything that I want to put into this draft I can put in. I did the same thing with the stories, and then it was a process of chiseling in draft after draft. I think about novels in the same way. My goal, whether with stories or this novel, is to make my characters as complicated and emotionally messy as people in real life, while keeping the sentences tight and compressed. One thing that really helps with this goal is, once I’m close to the end of a story and am entering revision mode, to read only poetry. At that point I don’t want any more research to weigh down the story so I stop reading nonfiction related to the topic, and because I don’t want another author’s voice to carry too much of an influence, I don’t read any fiction. I just read poetry: Louise Glück, Jean Valentine, Philip Levine. I love that time in my writing — that’s the first moment that the arc of the story finally feels complete and I can think solely about language. And now that the structure of the piece is set, I can think less chronologically and more about emotional time and memory, which feels much truer to real life.GAZETTE: I am interested in your work with character. In “The UnAmericans” you frequently assume the voice of a male character. Is that hard to do as a woman?ANTOPOL: Nothing about writing comes easily to me, but I would say the one thing that feels somewhat natural is voice. Once I’ve figured out my character, it really does feel like method acting. I just start thinking about how this person would react to whatever familial or professional or social situation I’m in. And in many ways my male characters or the women who are a lot older than I am felt easier to write because of the distance between me and them. It’s as if I’m able to get closer to the really intense emotional truths in my own life by writing from the perspective of the people different from myself. In many ways my male characters feel the most autobiographical — the distance allowed me to write about things that might have been too scary to look at head-on.GAZETTE: In reading your acknowledgements it struck me that it often seems to take a village to publish a book. Can you tell me about your village — your editors, your first readers and rereaders?ANTOPOL: My husband [journalist and author Chanan Tigay] is my first reader. I also have a few close friends I trade work with whose opinions are enormously valuable — we’ve been reading each other’s writing for years. My agent and I worked together for almost three years before he sent the book out. Every six months or so I’d send him a new draft of a story and [he’d] give me feedback — it was incredibly gratifying having him as an early reader. He was basically doing all that work for free, since it was so long before he sent the book out. Both he and my editor are writers, too — he writes fiction and memoir, she writes fiction and memoir and poetry — and that’s one of the things I love most about working with them both. I just trust their takes on my writing so deeply. Many of my editor’s thoughts on the stories were global or character-based, but I was also so happy to have her poet’s eye on the stories, especially when we talked in such depth about sentences.GAZETTE: How important is it for you that your husband and first reader is also a writer?ANTOPOL: People sometimes ask me whether it’s hard being married to another writer. The truth is, I can’t imagine being married to someone who isn’t a writer. We shout sentences we’ve just written across the apartment, and we both completely get it if the other one wants to disappear into another room for days, or forgets to pay the electricity bill. I think in the beginning we worried about being in competition with each other, but that was a long, long time ago. I was honestly just as happy the day he sold his book as when I sold mine. There’s something amazing about watching a person you love devote himself so fully to a project, not knowing whether anyone will ever read it. And he just works so hard — it’s inspiring to be around.GAZETTE: Is there anything that comes easier to you now — anything that was more challenging when you were first starting out?ANTOPOL: One thing that comes easier to me now is that it’s less painful to cut things from my book that aren’t working. It used to be pretty hard for me to get rid of a sentence or paragraph I liked once I realized it didn’t belong. Now I just move on. I have that folder on my desktop that I imagine a lot of writers have, a place where I store all of the orphaned sentences and phrases I love but had to cut, in the hope that they can be used somewhere else. But I’ve never once repurposed anything from that folder. Every sentence I write should be deeply connected to my character’s psychology, to their situation. And so it doesn’t feel truthful to pull a sentence from one story and tack it onto another. If it fits easily in another story, it means it probably wasn’t that interesting of a sentence to begin with. The more I write, the more firmly my goal is for the writing to be invisible and for the characters to take center stage, and that means doing away with anything that feels decorative or showy.last_img read more

first_imgCommentary by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The Wellington school board had an interesting discussion the other night.Wellington school board member Larry Mangan at the Oct. 9 meeting posed a legitimate question to the other elected members in the room: Does the Sellers Park football stadium fit the standards of the American Disabilities Act?That set off a debate amongst the members, and the answer to the question was never reached. About a decade ago, the school district installed bleachers on the visitor’s side which were indeed ADA compliant for wheelchair citizens. Wellington Superintendent Rick Weiss said by the letter of the law he was told that would make the stadium ADA compliant.However, he said if the stadium was to be completely rebuilt it would not meet ADA standards. The home stands are not compliant, nor were the restrooms or the paths leading to the stands. The discussion, as it always does, started to gravitate toward costs. How much would it cost the school district to make those stands ADA accessible? Someone threw out a figure of $250,000.I’m not sure if that was just a rough guess or based on sound reasoning, but $250,000? More than 99 percent of the homes in Wellington can not be sold for that kind of money but you are saying to rebuild the Sellers Park stands it will cost that much? I would like some more concrete figures. Wellington board member Jason Newberry said that it was best to leave the issue alone, not alert anyone that might force the school district to address it. Attaboy. The best solution to a problem is to ignore it.Board member Angie Ratcliff took it a step further with this quote.“I know one thing, I’m not in favor of spending school funds out there. We have plenty of other places to spend our our money on curriculum, textbooks and computers.”Ah, the education vs. athletic debate. If we invest just an ounce into athletic facilities, we are shortchanging our students in the classroom. Has anyone ever thought that sports can be part of the educational process? And can anyone really prove that athletic funding has hurt education endeavors when it is about 1 percent of the total budget?Let me ask Mr. Newberry and Ms. Ratcliff a pertinent question.Let’s say you unfortunately become disabled for whatever reason, whether it be in an automobile accident or a disease and you become strapped to a wheelchair. Would you be OK, knowing you would be unable to attend a football game, or perhaps an outdoor concert at Sellers Park, or a fireworks show, or even a graduation ceremony if the commencement exercise was moved back to the field?Or how about this. What if you had a child or grandchild who is disabled and wishes to attend a football game with his/her friends on a Friday night to cheer on the Crusaders? Are you ok with him/her sitting on the visitor’s side amongst a bunch of Andale fans, while his/her friends are cheering on the Crusaders on the other side?I wouldn’t be.Here’s the things about disabilities. Nobody chooses to be in a wheelchair.I’m sure a lot of you have been on crutches for a certain length of time because of a broken foot or whatever. I was on crutches for about two months. It stunk. Not only was it a pain to get from one place to the other, but for me I didn’t particularly like having a target on my back – with people staring at me or asking the inevitable question, “what did you do?”But I am lucky. I got better and walked again. Some people don’t have that luxury.  The thought that someone has to spend an eternity in a wheelchair is a tough way to live life.And that is why I support ADA legislation, and why I believe we have a moral obligation at every turn to try to make life as normal as possible for those who suffer from disabilities.The question whether Sellers Stadium is ADA accessible by the “letter of the law” is irrelevant. The question is can a person with disabilities attend a Wellington football game without being discriminated against?The answer is no.The Wellington football field has gone through incredible transformation lately – all I remind you through private donations and grassroots efforts. The stadium again rises to the level of our Crusader football team.But making the home stands ADA compatible is something that can’t be done by the private sector due to the various governmental laws. It’s an issue the board has to address.The question at the Oct. 9 meeting was whether or not to pay for a study to see what the costs of the stadium will be to make it ADA accessible.  I urge the board to follow through and get a study completed.Then, the board working with the community at large, can figure out what the best course of action can be in making our stadium accessible for everyone.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (21) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +17 Vote up Vote down WHSMOM · 303 weeks ago let’s just “sweep it under the rug” kind of statement to me by some current board members…what is going to happen to that budget when someone decides to stand up and sue for discrimination??? or if someone with a disability gets hurt??? and as for spending the budget on things for the classrooms…HA HA!!! maybe if we would see more school board members visiting classrooms talking AND listening to the teachers would be nice….and I mean ALL the schools…NOT just a chosen few… Great article Mr. McCue Report Reply 1 reply · active 303 weeks ago +9 Vote up Vote down Seen it happen · 303 weeks ago I am in the older group but 2 years ago at the football games that I attended, I personally seen two different people fall on the steps. One was 60’s ( in that area) and one was a school age that wasn’t running for once but going up stairs and very lucky they both did not break a leg. We haven’t been back as it is to hard to get around in the bleachers. Don’t wait till school gets a law suit over this. Get er done Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago +28 Vote up Vote down Rita & Jim Rutledge · 303 weeks ago As a parent that has a child that graduated from this district in 1993 and is permanently disabled, I am appalled that this issues is even being debated 21 years after the fact. At time she could not get in the stands and to this day still could not if she wanted to. In 1997 she sat in a wheelchair on the old track to watch her sister graduate, not with the rest of her family. The school buildings may be accessible, so why not the rest of the facilities. Where is the logic in this picture? I don’t have a student in the district at this time but I have had and if they are waiting for someone to alert them of the issue of ADA maybe I will be that person. Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago +11 Vote up Vote down WellMom · 303 weeks ago Wellington board member Jason Newberry said that it was best to leave the issue alone, not alert anyone that might force the school district to address it. Trust me, the people and family members of those in wheelchairs don’t need it to be pointed out that certain buildings etc have issues. Compliant and usable are often times different. You especially don’t forget every activity your child misses out on that their peers from school get to attend. Report Reply 1 reply · active 303 weeks ago +8 Vote up Vote down Sally · 303 weeks ago turn it in to ada. maybe newberry can pay for it then. Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago -11 Vote up Vote down notlla · 303 weeks ago Raise the Sales Tax , tha`ts the answer to every thing. or maybe we could build a new stadium out at the High school. Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago -2 Vote up Vote down Jason Newberry · 303 weeks ago Actually that was not exactly what I meant Tracy. My thinking is that per the district’s legal counsel we are compliant in regard to the ADA seating. I know it is on the visitors side, and sure I would like to see it on both as well, but there are other things that should probably be addressed first (sidewalks,restrooms). That is why I brought up the restrooms. There is more to being ADA compliant than seating on the home side, and we have to be ready to deal with those issues as well. Thanks. Report Reply 3 replies · active 303 weeks ago +15 Vote up Vote down Levi · 303 weeks ago To those against it: Put yourself in a wheelchair and try to access it just one time by yourself. Then imagine your life that way. Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago -6 Vote up Vote down nobody · 303 weeks ago I think is a valid concern but if you know anything about the financial crisis the school district faces; well you might understand that this could cost a lot of people their jobs. I think that community fundraising might be a better idea. I totally agree that all people should be able to access all school facilities. Maybe some of the business owners who are benefiting from Gov Brownback’s tax relief could step up and share a little? Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago +19 Vote up Vote down Meadow Lanes · 303 weeks ago As a parent of a special needs student who graduated over 10 years ago, I look back at all the changes that have happened over that time frame to the stadium to accommodate these students. absolutely nothing has been done, it is still the same. Its time to fix this. Its a shame that we have to watch a parent carry a special needs student into the stands so that they can sit with there classmates. Report Reply 0 replies · active 303 weeks ago 12Next » Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. 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first_imgSubmitted to Sumner Newscow — Today’s Wellington High School bulletin for Tuesday, May 3, 2016:Tuesday• Golf at Hesston• JV Golf at Clearwater• C-Team Baseball at WHSWednesday• Crusader Way- WSU TripThursday• Baseball at Clearwater• Softball at Clearwater• JV Baseball at Goddard• Golf at Tex ConsolverFriday• Regional Tennis• Track at ChaparralSaturday• JV Baseball at WHS• Baseball at KC TurnerSunday• BaccalaureateToday’s lunch — Chicken Patty, Mashed Potatoes with Gravy, Peas, Banana, Hot Roll and Milk.Tuesday’s lunch — Crispito with Red Sauce, Lettuce and Tomato, Sweet Corn, Chilled Peaches, Cheesy Bread Stick and Milk,Today’s News: *JV Golf is out at 1 p.m. today. JV Baseball is out at 2:50. They are marked Activity.*Members of WHS- Every year Operation Gratitude sends 150,000+ individually-addressed care packages to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines deployed overseas and to their children left behind. Also, to New Recruits, Veterans,. First Responders, Wounded Warriors and their caregivers.  Each package contains food items, hygiene products, entertainment, handmade items, and handwritten letters of support. Please see the box in the lunchroom to see the donation list. Donation will be accepted through Friday May 5th.*The Sports Banquet will be held in the Auditorium on Friday, May 6th at 7:00 am. Athletes from Cross Country, Boys Basketball, Wrestling, Softball, Baseball, Track and Golf need to attend. All student athletes are welcomed to attend. The athlete of the year will be announced during this time.*Classic Movie Club will be watching the movie “Dirty Harry” today at 3:15 p.m. in room 205.*Any Junior wanting to be a midterm completer next year needs to turn in the form to Mrs. Brown by May 6.*If you are interested in being a class officer next year, pick up an application in the office. You must have a minimum GPA of a 2.0 and you must be passing 5 classes to be eligible to serve as an officer. As an officer, you will be expected to attend monthly STUCO meetings. Applications will be due Friday May 6. Elections will be held on Tuesday, May 10th during 2nd hour.*Color Guard Try-outs will be this week starting at 5 p.m. in the gym. Wear closed toe shoes.*Help fight childhood hunger! You can bring crackers, PB & J packages, beanie weenies, microwave raviolis, mini cereal packages, pudding or canned foods. The last day to bring food is Thursday May 5th. You can bring cans to your first hour teacher to get put into a drawing for a fabulous prize.*It’s that time of year! Library books are due soon.  Seniors– Your books were due yesterday! Juniors, Sophomores and Freshman- Your library books are due on Friday May 6th before 3:05. Any book returned after 3:05 will be fined $1 per book, per day. Fines will be added to your school fee’s if not paid. Any book not returned by Friday, May 13th will be considered lost and a full replacement value will be charged.* The Lip Dub premiere is at 7:00 TONIGHT at the Regent and the cost is $5 per ticket. The tickets will be sold at the door and there are only a limited amount of seats available so mark your calendars and be one of the fist people to experience this awesome video!*The Free Will Baptist Church will be hosting the Baccalaureate on May 8th at 3:00. The church is located at 1219 North Plum.*There will be a Cross Country meeting after school on May 4th in the Health/PE Room.Today is National…National Chocolate Custard DayNational Garden Meditation DayNational Lumpy Rug DayNational Paranormal DayNational Raspberry Pop Over DayNational Teacher Appreciation DayNational Two Different Colored Shoes DayFollow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! 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Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

first_imgWinning start It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend LATEST STORIES A costly, catty dispute finally settled The House of Representatives on Tuesday voted 119-32 to approve the P1,000 budget.This was not the first time that the Blue Babble Battalion used the halftime show to get their message across. Last year, members of the team wore shirts that spelled “NOT A HERO.” A costly, catty dispute finally settled Learning about the ‘Ring of Fire’ Stop the EJKs and uphold human rights. #UAAPSeason80#MensBasketball pic.twitter.com/gVNJG6Geae— Ateneo Blue Babble (@AteneoBabble) September 13, 2017The Ateneo Blue Babble Battalion on Wednesday took a stand against the extrajudicial killings and the House of Representatives’ decision to allocate just P1,000 of the 2018 budget for the Commission on Human Rights.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogThe group made the statement during the its routine performance at the halftime break of the game between Ateneo and University of the Philippines at Smart Araneta Coliseum in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament.ADVERTISEMENT Break new ground Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Right mindset key to Dennison’s easy transition to FEU’s go-to-guy For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. MOST READ After tearing a huge placard that said “P1,000″ into two, members of the BBB held up signs that read “stop the EJKs [extra judicial killings], uphold human rights” during their performance. OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View commentslast_img read more