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first_imgThe Brooklyn-born funk juggernaut, Lettuce, will be headed to Japan this year for three dates in late March. The run is set to hit Tokyo and Osaka, and each performance is to occur at the Billboard Live venue in those cities. The two dates in Tokyo fall on March 22nd and 23rd, and the third date in Osaka falls on the 24th. While it’s unlikely that many North American fans will be joining the band for this string of shows, many of us who can’t be there are hopeful that this trip will bring about another live album, like Lettuce’s previously released Live in Tokyo, born from their November 2003 performance at the Japanese jazz club, Blue Note.last_img read more

first_imgHomemade jams and jellies can be a delicious way to extend the summer bounty, but a University of Georgia food preservation expert urges people to follow the rules when canning at home. “Even though sugar has a preservative action in jams and jellies, molds can still grow and spoil these products,” said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Cooperative Extension specialist. “USDA and UGA Cooperative Extension endorse a boiling water canning process for jams and jellies, which will make the potential for mold spoilage as small as possible.” Use the following steps, Andress says, to preserve food safely at home: Start with boiling water. Before cooking the jam, fill a boiling water canner with enough warm water to cover filled jars one to two inches above the lids. The canner needs to be centered over the stove’s burner and should be level. Add the jars before bringing the water to a boil to sterilize them. Empty jars need to be submerged in boiling water for 10 minutes for sterilization. If no sterilization is needed, heat the water in the canner to 180 degrees, simmering, to process filled jars. Wash pint or half-pint canning jars in hot water with dishwashing detergent or in a dishwasher. Sterilize jars if needed. Sterilized or not, keep jars hot until ready to be filled. Prepare canning jar lids according to manufacturers directions. Cook jam or jelly according to recipe directions. Skim off foam if present. Fill jars. If the jars were pre-sterilized, remove them from the canner when it is time to fill them and tilt them to quickly empty any water inside them into the canner. Fill jars with the hot jelly or jam mixture, leaving a fourth-inch headspace. Wipe the rim of the jar with a clean paper towel and seal the jars with lids. Adjust the ring bands as needed. Work quickly to insure the filled jars stay as hot as possible until they are ready to be loaded into the canner for processing. Load the filled jars, using a jar lifter, into the canner. Keep the jars upright at all times to prevent jelly or jam from spilling into the sealed area of the lid. The canner should be simmering when jars are added, not boiling.Boil filled containers. Turn the burner under the canner to its highest setting and place a lid on the canner. Return the water to a boil. If the jars were sterilized, boil the filled jars for five minutes. If hot, clean jars were used, process for 10 minutes. Keep a lid on the canner while processing to keep water boiling. Turn off the heat once the jars have processed, and remove the canner lid. Wait five minutes before removing jars from the canner. Use a jar lifter to remove the hot jars from the canner. Place the jars on a towel or cake cooling rack. Leave at least one inch of space between the jars during cooling. Cool jars upright for 12 to 24 hours while the vacuum seal is drawn and the jam or jelly sets. When using two-piece metal canning lids, do not tighten ring bands on the lids or push down on the center of the flat metal lid until the jar is completely cooled. Remove ring bands from sealed jars. Label and store in a cool, dry place out of direct light. Follow these UGA and USDA recommendations will help limit the risk of mold growth and spoilage of homemade jams and jellies. “There is some evidence that molds growing on fruit products could produce mycotoxins, or mold poisons,” Andress said. “A few other organisms could also spoil jams and jellies. It is best to take steps to prevent molding and spoilage, and thereby also protecting your investment of fruit, time and money by not having to throw away spoiled jams and jellies.”For more information from the National Center for Home Food Preservation on making jams and jellies, visit www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can7_jam_jelly.last_img read more

first_imgNJ.com 27 June 2020Family First Comment: “The unethical choices the tobacco industry made decades ago marketing its addictive and harmful products to kids and the lax government oversight that allowed it to happen are playing out again in California’s legal weed industry, according to a new study… Lynn Silver, the pediatrician and lead author, said she is not opposed to marijuana legalization, but based on what the study found is “deeply concerned by the irresponsible way legalization is occurring in the U.S. that is allowing the emergence of a new tobacco-like industry.”The unethical choices the tobacco industry made decades ago marketing its addictive and harmful products to kids and the lax government oversight that allowed it to happen are playing out again in California’s legal weed industry, according to a new study.With New Jersey voters going to the polls Nov. 3 to decide whether to approve a constitutional amendment expanding its medical marijuana law to all adults 21 and older, the study by the Public Health Institute offers ideas of how the state could take a firmer hand regulating the burgeoning industry.The authors — a pediatrician, an attorney and a research scientist — examined the laws in 534 of California’s 539 cities and counties a year after marijuana was legalized for adults 21 and older in 2018.Lynn Silver, the pediatrician and lead author, said she is not opposed to marijuana legalization, but based on what the study found is “deeply concerned by the irresponsible way legalization is occurring in the U.S. that is allowing the emergence of a new tobacco-like industry.”California has a flourishing market for high-potency products, like edibles and concentrates known as dabs, which lack prominent and explicit warning labels, Silver said. It’s not hard to find dried flowers with THC levels as much as 30%, and as much as three times that amount for concentrates, she said.Cannabis-infused soda and gummies and other products with names like “girl scout cookie” appear to target youth, much in the way “Joe Camel” lured young smokers and cherry and bubble gum-flavored nicotine vapes targeted minors. Billboards promoting marijuana products are commonplace, and cannabis consumption at concerts and fairs is permitted, according to the article.READ MORE: https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2020/06/marijuana-industry-using-tobaccos-old-tactics-of-preying-on-kids-study-says.htmlKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

first_imgDES MOINES — A state senator from southeast Iowa wants to adjust the financing for students who attend school outside the district in which they live.It’s called “open enrollment.” For 30 years, Iowa parents have been able to enroll their kids in public school districts outside the one in which they live. Senator Tom Greene, a Republican from Burlington, says it’s “a real financial issue” for districts that are losing students.“I think open enrollment is here to stay,” Greene says. “It’s not going to change and I understand that, but what I want to do is change the funding mechanism.”Greene is proposing that the home district — where the student lives — keep of 12 percent of the “per pupil” spending for each student who “open enrolls” into another district. Green says that means all the state and federal tax dollars would follow a student to the other school, but the taxes paid by local property owners would stay put. Green says sending property tax dollars to another district is “taxation without representation.”“The Burlington School District totally surrounds the West Burlington School District. The West Burlington School District has 800 and 900 students; 53 percent of those students reside outside the boundaries of the West Burlington School District,” Greene says. “A huge amount of money comes into the West Burlington School District from outside, but those taxpayers have no say in how that money is spent. That’s my biggest concern.”Before his election to the state senate, Greene was a member of the Burlington School Board and served as its president.last_img read more

first_imgDES MOINES — Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley is applauding the tentative trade deal reached between the U-S and Japan, calling it a very “welcome development.”  Grassley says, “It arrives at a time when farmers are hurting, in need of new market access opportunities and a chance to compete on a level playing field with agriculture all over the globe.”Strengthening ties with Japan, Grassley says, will help to also strengthen the United States’ position while negotiating with China. While only an overview of the agreement with Japan was released by the White House last weekend, Grassley says what he’s heard so far is very encouraging. Grassley says, “Gaining agricultural market access to the world’s third-largest economy is a big win for President Trump, Iowa farmers and agriculture generally.”It’s possible, according to Grassley, the agreement can be signed without Congressional approval. He calls it “very positive news” and a “significant step” toward securing a comprehensive trade agreement with Japan which he says could benefit all sectors of the U-S economy. ”  Grassley says, “It appears that the Japanese have agreed to provide new access for U.S. dairy, pork, ethanol, beef, wine and wheat in return for the elimination of U.S. tariffs on industrial goods.”The agreement is expected to be signed at the United Nations General Assembly meeting in late September.last_img read more