first_img KCS-content by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeAlphaCute30 Rules That All “Hells Angels” Have To FollowAlphaCuteDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’DefinitionTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island Farmthedelite.comNetflix Cancellations And Renewals: The Full List For 2021thedelite.com whatsapp Sunday 23 January 2011 10:23 pm Share Talks between Riversdale Mining and China’s Wuhan Iron & Steel Corp over acquiring a state in the Zambeze coal project in Mozambique have been suspended while a takeover bid by Rio Tinto remains on the table, Riversdale said. Riversdale is recommending its shareholders accept Rio Tinto’s offer, saying it was unaware of any higher offers in the works. center_img Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofYoga for Beginners: 3 Different Types of Yoga You Should TryFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofBack on the Rails for Summer New York to New Orleans, Savannah and MiamiFamily ProofThe Truth About Bottled Water – Get the Facts on Drinking Bottled WaterGayotChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof Riversdale Mining talks stall whatsapp Show Comments ▼ Tags: NULLlast_img read more

first_img KCS-content whatsapp Monday 24 January 2011 7:24 pm FACT CHECKER whatsappcenter_img Share MAYOR JOINS FUEL COST DEBATEMAYOR Boris Johnson occasionally piles a spot of political pressure on his old Etonian chum, Prime Minister David Cameron.Having complained about the government’s policies on immigration, City bonuses and the 50p tax rate, Johnson has now joined a chorus calling for the introduction of a “fuel stabiliser” – effectively a drop in tax rates when petrol prices increase, to relieve the burden on motorists.“The price [of petrol] clobbers small businesses,” complained Johnson.The Conservatives promised a fuel stabiliser before the general election, but the pledge did not make it into the coalition agreement – and what’s more, the coalition is continuing Labour’s policy of a “fuel escalator,” imposing a one pence increase on fuel duty.Nine in ten small firms say the increase will cost them up to £2,000 in the next six months, the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) has complained. Over a third of small businesses said they would have to reduce business investment because of high fuel costs.But the government’s fiscal watchdog has cast doubt over the feasibility of the stabiliser. Robert Chote, head of the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) (pictured right), said yesterday that the measure would probably make the government’s finance “less stable than more stable.”Government revenue actually falls when oil prices increase, the OBR found, due to a fall in demand and the inflationary effects of price hikes. In the first year of a rise in oil of £10 a barrel, tax revenues may increase by £100m, it said. But in year two of a price rise, revenues would fall by £700m. And offsetting the £10 increase in oil prices at the petrol pump would cost the Treasury £3.7bn.“They would simply have to find money from somewhere else,” said Karl Emmerson of the Institute for Fiscal Studies.THE VERDICTGOVERNMENT CAN’T CONTROL PRICESThe Prime Minister faces a political dilemma – appease small business and annoy environmentalists, or vica versa. Economic activity and growth rely on fuel, business groups explain. Increasing fuel duty to reduce emissions reduces this activity. A “fuel stabiliser” to iron out price fluctuations, will not work, economists say. The premise — that government revenue increases when petrol prices rise — is false, at least in the medium term. And short term fluctuations cannot be predicted by government, the IFS said. On petrol prices, the PM cannot please all the people all the time. Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼last_img read more

first_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search AdsAlphaCute30 Rules That All “Hells Angels” Have To FollowAlphaCuteDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’DefinitionMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island Farm Monday 31 January 2011 8:08 pm Share Tags: NULL More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com KCS-content center_img whatsapp Show Comments ▼ French giant has started to lose edge whatsapp CARREFOUR’S executives certainly need to do something to revive the retailer’s flagging fortunes. Anyone who has holidayed in France regularly over the last few years will have noticed that the supermarket giant is losing its edge. It used to be that one of the pleasures of hopping across the channel was a trip to l’hypermarché – with its counters of fresh cheeses and meats – which put most British supermarkets to shame. That’s not true any more: the best branches of Tesco and J Sainsbury can take on Carrefour any day. Of course, they aren’t strictly competing for the same customers in their domestic markets, except in Calais, perhaps. But it does show that something has gone wrong at the French supermarket in recent years. The numbers tell a similar story. Carrefour posted revenue growth of 5.8 per cent last year, or 1.6 per cent when you strip out fuel sales, compared to 7.6 per cent for Tesco.The markets certainly think there is more value in the British leader. Even though Tesco has lower annual sales (£62.5bn in 2009-10 compared to £73.2bn for Carrefour), it still has a higher market capitalisation (£32.33bn against £20.5bn, and that’s with a weaker pound). A flotation or sale of around half of Carrefour’s discounter Dia is an idea worth pursuing: a leaner business could take better advantage of opportunities in emerging markets like Turkey, Brazil and Argentina. Analysts at RBS reckon a sale of 49 per cent of Carrefour Property and Dia would raise €5bn (£4.29bn), while an IPO of 49 per cent of each business would raise €7.8 a share.That is certainly more attractive than management’s strategy of cutting costs while maintaining €1.5bn of investment in Carrefour’s French stores. The sum of the parts is likely worth much more. last_img read more

first_img Share Show Comments ▼ whatsapp KCS-content Rockhopper drills at Sea Lion Falklands oil explorer Rockhopper has started drilling its first appraisal well in the Sea Lion oil and gas deposit, the Aim-listed firm said yesterday. Drilling operations are expected to take approximately 38 days and a further announcement will be made once drilling is completed. Rockhopper abandoned a nearby exploration well earlier this month after deciding that using the oil deposits would be uncommercial. center_img whatsapp by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailPeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople TodayTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSenior Living | Search AdsNew Senior Apartments Coming to Scottsdale (Take A Look at The Prices)Senior Living | Search AdsSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeWanderoamIdentical Twins Marry Identical Twins – But Then The Doctor Says, “STOP”Wanderoam Monday 21 February 2011 7:50 pm More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.com Tags: NULLlast_img read more

first_img Show Comments ▼ KCS-content whatsapp Tags: NULL EXPRESS owner Richard Desmond will launch a new UK lottery game that he says will raise millions for charity and provide “life changing” prizes for customers.He said the Health Lottery, which will sell tickets for £1, will pump at least £50m a year into health projects in local areas that are outside of NHS funding.Desmond, who bought Channel 5 last year, believes he can offer unrivalled distribution and marketing of the project through his stable of magazines and newspapers, which also includes OK! It is thought Channel 5 will host the lottery draw, although details are yet to be confirmed. Read This NextNew England Patriots’ Cam Newton says no extra motivation from Mac Jones’SportsnautRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe Wrap’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The Wrap2 HFPA Members Resign Citing a Culture of ‘Corruption and Verbal Abuse’The Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe Wrap Monday 28 February 2011 7:39 pm Desmond to launch new Health Lottery project Share whatsapplast_img read more

first_img ENGINEERING and construction firm Costain said it has not pulled out of the bidding for Mouchel, despite the support services group turning to Interserve as preferred suitor.“We haven’t walked away and we are very much in an offer period,” said chief executive Andrew Wyllie. But Costain added it was also pursuing a number of large acquisition targets after reporting a 54 per cent rise in profits last year to £27.9m, on revenues of £1.02bn. Costain was rejected by Mouchel despite improving on its previous proposal of 0.5531 Costain shares plus 30p in cash for each Mouchel share, with the target turning instead to an unspecified alternative offer from maintenance and outsourcing group Interserve.“We are the preferred offeror at this stage of the game, so at this stage there’s no reason to suggest that that could change,” Interserve chief Adrian Ringrose said yesterday, adding he sees no further Mouchel developments for a number of weeks as it carries out due diligence. Share Tags: NULL …as it races Costain in bid for Mouchel Wednesday 9 March 2011 7:55 pm Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe Wrap2 HFPA Members Resign Citing a Culture of ‘Corruption and Verbal Abuse’The Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe Wrap’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The Wrap’Small Axe’: Behind the Music Everyone Grooved On in Steve McQueen’sThe Wrap whatsapp Show Comments ▼ whatsapp KCS-content last_img read more

first_img Applications up for City jobs CITY firms are struggling to hang on to staff despite plans to increase salaries and bonuses by more than inflation, according to two surveys by recruitment firms.Financial recruiter Robert Half says that a survey of 280 chief financial officers (CFOs), shows 61 per cent of listed firms are planning to put up salaries in coming months, more than two thirds of them by five to six per cent and a fifth by seven to 10 per cent.The research also shows that increases in bonuses will just about match inflation, with a third of CFOs planning to put them up by three to four per cent, and half planning to raise them by five to six per cent.Numbers from rival City recruiter Astbury Marsden show why: it says the number of applications it received in February has soared to 7,400, a 47 per cent jump year-on-year as disgruntled employees consider options and prepare to ditch their current employer.The data shows that non-top tier investment bankers, in particular, are upset about their pay levels. Astbury Marsden chief operating officer Mark Cameron: says “Dissatisfaction about pay is inevitable among such a hyper-competitive cohort as investment bankers – they see bonuses as the way to keep score and they hate to lose.”He added that some investment banks are reporting staff turnover for the first quarter of 20 per cent – way above the usual churn that follows bonus season.The rise in applications has not quite been matched by an equivalent jump in vacancies, but there were nonetheless 30 per cent more jobs added to the recruiter’s register this February than last. More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comSidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin are graying and frayingnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.com Share whatsapp KCS-content Monday 14 March 2011 8:39 pm Show Comments ▼ whatsapp Tags: NULLlast_img read more

first_img whatsapp Topaz eyes a London listing to raise £311m More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org KCS-content DUBAI-based oilfield services firm Topaz Energy and Marine plans to raise $500m (£311m) in a London listing.The firm, which is part of Oman’s Renaissance Services, is likely to power into the FTSE 250 if the listing is successful, with a market capitalisation of $1.7bn.Topaz has set a price range of 170p per share to 230p per share and plans to list early next month. It will use the funds to expand its operations and repay debt.The oilfield services firm plans to spend up to $2.5bn over the next two years to acquire 75 new vessels for its fleet. It currently has 100 vessels, focused on shallow-water operations. The firm said it plans to expand into deep-water, moving into regions off the coast of Brazil and West Africa.Topaz chief executive Fazel Fazelbhoy said: “The era of easy oil is over. The most exciting finds are coming increasingly offshore.”The global offer is subject to Renaissance shareholders approving the move at the company’s annual general meeting on 28 March. As the Oman-listed firm’s marine unit, Topaz made earnings before interest depreciation and amortisation of $127m last year.Fears the company’s exposure to the Middle East would detract from investor appetite for the offering were played down yesterday. It said most of its operations were offshore and that its operations, centred on the Caspian Sea, remained away from current unrest.However, the BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill could have a bearing for firms looking to move into deepwater operations, warned ING analyst Jason Kenny. He said: “Deepwater is going to remain the domain of large cap oil firms, as they can shoulder the burden insurers require for those operations.”RUPERT HUME-KENDALLMERRILL LYNCHRUPERT Hume-Kendall is leading the advisory for Bank of America Merrill Lynch on the Topaz Energy and Marine initial public offering (IPO).The bank is acting as joint bookrunner on the deal alongside fellow bookrunner and sole global coordinator and sponsor JP Morgan Cazenove.As chairman of global capital markets, Hume-Kendall recently advised on the privatisation of VTB Bank, the state-owned Russian lender, in a $3.3bn (£2bn) share sale.He also led the advisory for a $6.6bn raising by Japan’s fourth-largest bank, Resona.Hume-Kendall has a particular focus on European and Asian markets, and has led the funding of many of Merrill Lynch’s largest and most prestigious clients, including BT, RBS, and Lloyds Banking Group.He joined Merrill Lynch in 1998 from Swiss bank UBS, where he had worked for five years following a period at Schroders.Merrill Lynch managing director in corporate broking Andrew Osborne joined him on the Topaz advisory. Tags: NULL Wednesday 16 March 2011 8:44 pm Share whatsapp Show Comments ▼last_img read more

first_img WHAT passes for moderate these days when it comes to banking reform is in fact pretty radical. Yesterday’s interim paper from Sir John Vickers’ Independent Commission on Banking (ICB), if it is implemented, will trigger vast changes to the way UK banks operate – but it reads as a surprisingly sensible and balanced piece of work. There was quite a lot of good stuff in it, especially the measures to try and protect taxpayers and to facilitate orderly wind-downs of failed banks – and also several problems and inconsistencies, some fence-sitting, an occasional lack of precision and other issues. While the ICB wants Lloyds to sell more branches than the 600 previously agreed, it doesn’t say how many; and it fails to adequately define the boundaries between retail and other kinds of banking, making it hard to quantify what the cost would be of holding more capital against UK retail subsidiaries. Its account of the crisis is way too unidimensional, though that was probably because of the report’s limited remit rather than any genuine lack of understanding.On balance, however, the ICB’s proposals would make the banking system more resilient, reduce the risk to taxpayers and won’t, on their own, trigger an exodus of large banks from the City. I have to say that this comes as a relief: radical reform of financial regulation is needed, but it needs to be of the right kind. As recently as a few months ago, it looked as if the ICB was going down the wrong route – so it is good news that it isn’t. Its discussion of co-cos, bail-in bonds, the need for bondholders to bear losses and the role of new bankruptcy procedures, including those already agreed in the 2009 Banking Act, are instructive. But there are some problems. It is absolutely right to want to improve competition in the retail banking market. But not all of its suggestions are sensible. Moving to full bank account portability is a great idea – it has become easier to switch mobile phone provider ever since customers were able to keep their numbers. The same would be true with bank accounts. The ICB is also right that elevated levels of regulation and capital requirements serve as barriers to entry; it is also clear that much of the extra competition before the crisis was actually unsustainable and created by liquidity-rich, high risk forms of lending (such as those practised by Icelandic banks). However, the idea that new banks could use other firms’ branches, mooted yesterday, would dilute property rights too much. The ICB’s view that Lloyds should sell more branches is short-sighted: no business will ever trust a deal with the British government again. Lloyds TSB had Gordon Brown’s backing to rescue HBOS; it had been explicitly agreed that competition rules would be waived. The ICB estimates that the implicit subsidy to large banks thanks to the government’s bail-out guarantee is worth more than £10bn a year. There are no cash transfers from taxpayers – but banks can borrow at a cheaper cost and have an incentive to take more risk. The remedy is to create a ring-fenced subsidiary for UK retail operations with more capital and to introduce living wills and specially tailored bankruptcy procedures. In the event of a problem, the government could rescue the retail operation while allowing the rest of the bank to go bust. The ICB wants to increase the amount of capital held by retail banking subsidiaries from seven per cent to 10 per cent. Banks could withstand a five per cent drop in the value of their assets, rather than 3.5 per cent. But this reform has an unintended consequence: it guarantees even more firmly than before banks’ retail operations. So the implicit subsidy remains, albeit on a smaller scale, and retail units have an incentive to take more risk. This is silly. It would have made sense at least to consider Europe Economics’ Andrew Lilico’s idea that banks could be made to offer special, 100 per cent gilt-backed, fully secure storage accounts in addition to their regular fractional reserve accounts. Consumers would be able to chose to put their savings in either the storage accounts, which would be backed by the state, or in ordinary bank accounts, which would not be. Crucially, the ICB’s proposals are clearly designed to ensure that banks would not be better off if they moved their HQ abroad. Anybody operating a retail bank in the UK would have to hold more capital, wherever they are based. This report is hardly perfect – but it certainly won’t kill the [email protected] me on Twitter: @allisterheath Some good ideas, some silly ones – but no disasters KCS-content Share Show Comments ▼ whatsappcenter_img whatsapp Tags: NULL Monday 11 April 2011 8:52 pmlast_img read more

first_img Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The Wrap2 HFPA Members Resign Citing a Culture of ‘Corruption and Verbal Abuse’The WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe WrapNew England Patriots’ Cam Newton says no extra motivation from Mac Jones’Sportsnaut’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe Wrap’Small Axe’: Behind the Music Everyone Grooved On in Steve McQueen’sThe Wrap KCS-content Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼ Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBetterBeDrones Capture Images No One Was Suppose to SeeBetterBeTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island Farmthedelite.comNetflix Cancellations And Renewals: The Full List For 2021thedelite.comAlphaCute30 Rules That All “Hells Angels” Have To FollowAlphaCuteDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’Definition Tuesday 12 April 2011 8:14 pmcenter_img Leicester Tigers consider IPO Leicester Tigers are plotting an initial public offering (IPO) to raise more than £4.4m to develop their stadium. Rugby league’s Aviva Premiership champions had planned an IPO two years ago, but are now reviving the plans to pay for work at their Welford Road ground. The fundraising would help to build a multi-storey car park and could be used to improve changing-room facilities. Former CBI chief Lord Digby Jones has been brought onto the board to advise on the listing, which could be set for this autumn. whatsapp whatsapplast_img read more